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2018 TASH Conference
Attending this event?
Each year, the TASH Conference brings together a diverse community of stakeholders who gain information, learn about resources, and connect with others across the country to strengthen the disability field. This year’s conference theme, “Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life,” reminds us to think outside the box during times of uncertainty. Creativity, innovation, and determination can pave the way for meaningful and inclusive lives for people with disabilities.

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Tuesday, November 27
 

9:30am

Pre-Board Meeting
This meeting is open to TASH board members only.


Moderators
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy... Read More →
avatar for Ruby Moore

Ruby Moore

Executive Director, Georgia Advocacy Office
Ruby Moore is the Executive Director of the Georgia Advocacy Office, the designated Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities in Georgia. Moore is nationally known for her work in the disability field over the past 35 years, particularly in the areas of employment... Read More →

Tuesday November 27, 2018 9:30am - 11:00am
Hospitality Suite - Room 1624 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

11:30am

TASH Board of Directors Meeting
Meeting open to TASH board members only.

Moderators
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy... Read More →
avatar for Ruby Moore

Ruby Moore

Executive Director, Georgia Advocacy Office
Ruby Moore is the Executive Director of the Georgia Advocacy Office, the designated Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities in Georgia. Moore is nationally known for her work in the disability field over the past 35 years, particularly in the areas of employment... Read More →

Tuesday November 27, 2018 11:30am - 6:00pm
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

6:30pm

Registration Open
Check in and get your name badge before the rush! Registration will be open during these hours.

Thank you to our lanyard sponsor, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network!

Sponsors
avatar for Spaulding Rehabilitation Network

Spaulding Rehabilitation Network

A member of Partners HealthCare, the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network includes Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, as well as Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Cape Cod, Spaulding Hospital Cambridge and Spaulding Nursing and Therapy Center Brighton, as well as twenty-five outpatient... Read More →


Tuesday November 27, 2018 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Registration Desk - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201
 
Wednesday, November 28
 

7:00am

Registration Open
Check in and get your name badge here! Registration will be open during these hours.

Thank you to our lanyard sponsor, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network!

Sponsors
avatar for Spaulding Rehabilitation Network

Spaulding Rehabilitation Network

A member of Partners HealthCare, the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network includes Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, as well as Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Cape Cod, Spaulding Hospital Cambridge and Spaulding Nursing and Therapy Center Brighton, as well as twenty-five outpatient... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 7:00am - 6:00pm
Registration Desk - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

7:59am

About Wednesday Workshops
Wednesday Workshops are short-course workshops that are delivered by teams of presenters around a particular topic in a scheduled room from 1.5 up to four hours. Workshops allow attendees to dive into popular topics in more depth. Workshops take place on Wednesday only.

Wednesday November 28, 2018 7:59am - 5:00pm
All Meeting Floors

7:59am

About Wednesday Workshops - Employment Track
Each year, the TASH conference brings together self advocates, leaders, and professionals in the field to share information and new research that focuses on improving competitive, integrated employment outcomes for transition-aged youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. TASH and its members have been pioneers in employment strategies for more than 40 years, leading to the spread of research and best-practices that have directly improved outcomes for individuals with disabilities. The YES! Center, in collaboration with TASH, will host a series of Wednesday Workshops that will feature sessions focused on Policy and Practice.

Wednesday November 28, 2018 7:59am - 5:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Let's Get to Work! - Opening Doors to Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

The unemployment rate for individuals with disabilities remains at more than double that of the rest of the population; meanwhile, the job market is more competitive than it has been in recent history. Countless positions across the country are unfilled because employers are unable to find qualified people to hire or train. This demand has driven employers to consider candidates from much wider sources, including the talented pool of individuals with disabilities. For candidates with disabilities, however, there appears to be both real and perceived barriers at every turn. This opening session will focus on the ways individuals and families can connect with partners at both public and private agencies to aid them in their journey. Hear from the employer’s perspective on ways applicants can frame conversations and inform companies on how they can effectively meet the demands of a job. Attendees will also learn about approaches for young people to be effective advocates with potential employers and to learn about employer best practices on creating programs to serve as a pipelines for talented young people with disabilities to contribute to an organization.

Presenters
avatar for Oswald

Oswald "Oz" Mondejar

Vice President of Talent Management, Partners HealthCare
Oz Mondejar is the Vice President of Talent Management at Partners HealthCare. He also serves as the Senior Vice President of Mission and Advocacy for Partners Continuing Care, Inc. (“PCC”), the non-acute care services division of Partners HealthCare. Oz works at the intersection... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Be A Hero! - Developing Innovative Strategies for Emergency Preparedness Trainings
Limited Capacity seats available

In many areas of our nation, persons with disabilities are considered to be an extra burden to the first responder community when considering inclusion in the emergency planning process. This session will discuss why this is problematic for individuals with significant disabilities, and how individuals should take responsibility for their own safety and get involved with the Local Emergency Planning Committees and Health Care Coalitions for a more inclusive planning process. Specific information will be provided to assist individuals in the planning process with more than the basic "Make a Plan, Build a Kit, Stay Informed" concepts. This presentation will share innovative approaches and creative solutions for creating emergency plans specific to each individual's needs and abilities. Information will also be shared on collaborating with local emergency planning agencies, connecting with local disability organizations, what to consider when providing trainings for individuals with different spoken languages and cultures; and how to provide this training in an informative, engaging, and fun format.

Presenters

Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:00am - 10:00am
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Inclusion is Not a Program - The Call for Citizen Centered Leadership
Limited Capacity seats available

When positive change comes for people with disabilities, it is because people come to realize that most service organizations tend to engage in actions that do not fully address the social reality that faces people with disabilities. Person-centered work and community inclusion take on different meanings depending on the context and design of programs and services. Participants will engage in lively discussion as they compare and contrast inclusion, integration and person-centered planning across three very distinct service models.


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:00am - 10:00am
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Moving Pictures: A Hope & Creativity Project with Youth
Limited Capacity seats available

This participatory action research project employed an arts-based collaboration model for community youth with and without disabilities in Lawrence, Kansas, Summer 2017 to measure changes in reported creative self-efficacy and hope. Filling out a Hope Scale for Teens and conducting pre and post-test focus groups discussing hope, resilience and creativity measured change in perspective. Arts-based process (PhotoVoice / devised theatre) including drama games, story building, narratives and a photography debriefing component allowed youth to create a culminating project.

Presenters

Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:00am - 10:00am
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Advocacy WITH: Learning from the Neurodiversity and Self-Advocacy Movements
Limited Capacity seats available

Advocates for disabled people set an example for how it's acceptable to treat their clients and service recipients through how they themselves do so. Unfortunately, even among professionals who have spent decades in the field of disability advocacy, it's all too common to buy into milder or more subtle forms of ableism that can compromise their work, whether in how they interact with clients or what outcomes they see as desirable. To achieve full inclusion and respect for human rights, it's important for advocates to continually learn about and keep in mind their clients' perspectives, and to identify and address the barriers that prevent them from being the best possible partners to their clients in working toward these goals. In this workshop, we, as self-advocates and legal professionals, will work with participants to develop greater understandings of our movements as well as develop strategies for effective collaboration with people with developmental disabilities.

Presenters
avatar for Lydia X. Z. Brown

Lydia X. Z. Brown

Justice Catalyst Fellow, The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
Lydia X. Z. Brown is a disability justice advocate, organizer, and writer whose work has largely focused on violence against multiply-marginalized disabled people, especially institutionalization, incarceration, and policing. In collaboration with E. Ashkenazy and Morénike Giwa-Onaiwu... Read More →
avatar for Shain M. Neumeier

Shain M. Neumeier

Founder & Attorney, Law Office of Shain M. Neumeier


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Communication Supports and Strategies: Research to Practice!
Limited Capacity seats available

The TASH Communication Workgroup will host this session focused on connecting established and emerging research related to Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) to a) the experiences of AAC users and b) practical strategies that teachers and support providers can use to increase access for the individuals they support. The field of AAC includes researchers, users, and practitioners. Newer evidence has strengthened previous knowledge regarding the power AAC modeling and core vocabulary, literacy for AAC users, contextualized instruction in natural settings, and advances related to access through available technologies (e.g. eye gaze and head mouse). We will work on bridging the divides that can sometimes occur between researchers, users, and practitioners by connecting both established and emerging research to the users who benefit from these approaches. In turn, users will share the types of support that have been most effective for them. Finally, practitioners will describe strategies for implementing evidence-based and emerging practices in schools, home and community.

Presenters
JB

Judy Bailey

Consultant on AAC/FC/RPM and Positive Supports, Judy C. Bailey Consulting
Judy C. Bailey, M.Ed., has been a facilitator and trainer in typing to communicate for over twenty years, in northern Virginia and the metro D.C. area. She completed the Intro and Train the Trainer seminars for supported typing (FCT) at the ICI at Syracuse University and intro level... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

State of Play: Developments and Future of Inclusive Recreation and Leisure
Limited Capacity seats available

TBA

Moderators
avatar for Susan Fleming

Susan Fleming

Executive Director, Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis
Susan Fleming serves as the Executive Director of the Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis, a not-for-profit organization that works to promote and support recreation opportunities for individuals with disabilities who reside in the Greater St. Louis area. Susan has worked in... Read More →

Presenters
avatar for Mary Patstone

Mary Patstone

Adaptive Sports Center Director, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network
Mary Patstone is the Network Director of Spaulding Adaptive Sports Centers (SASC) which is part of the nationally renowned Spaulding Rehabilitation Network.  Mary holds an undergraduate degree in Political Science from Saint Michael’s College and an MA in Philanthropy and Development... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Relaxation Room
A low-sensory relaxation room is available for all TASH conference attendees; located on the Lobby level near the escalators.

Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:00am - 5:00pm
Willamette - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

TASH Doctoral Students and Early Career Faculty Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

This Wednesday session is meant for you! Come learn about important topics for doctoral students and early career faculty! During this session, nationally-recognized faculty will share their strategies for beginning a successful career as a faculty member in special education. Topics addressed during this session include establishing a professional identity, establishing a research agenda, and implementing high-quality teacher preparation programs.

8:20-8:50 AM
Establishing a Professional Identity - Andrea Ruppar

8:50-9:50 AM
Grants and External Funding - Mary E. Morningstar
OR
Teacher Preparation - Stacy Dymond, Donna Lehr

9:50- 10:50 AM
Developing and Sustaining a Research Agenda - Vicki Knight, Fred Spooner

10:50-11:50 AM
Service and Professional Development - April Regester, Amy Toson
OR
Publishing - Marty Agran, Susan Copeland, Stacy Dymond, Donna Lehr, Fred Spooner

11:50 AM -12:20 PM
Promotion and Tenure - Fred Spooner

Moderators
Presenters
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at... Read More →
SC

Susan Copeland

Professor, University of New Mexico
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Professor, Portland State University
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:20am - 12:20pm
Belmont - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:45am

Discovery: Successful Employment for Individuals with Significant Barriers to Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

There are several forms of Discovery including Facilitated Discovery, Guided Group Discovery and Self-Guided Discovery. All forms support not only employment for individuals with significant disabilities, but also facilitating natural supports, self-advocacy, family support, real pay for real jobs, and wrap around services. All forms of Discovery can benefit any job seeker who faces barriers to employment. Discovery is a universal design approach that is very effective for people with disabilities. It is used in partnership with a number of systems, so that people can receive support through multiple agencies at the same time, as needed. Youth and adults with disabilities, for example, can engage in Guided Group Discovery that is supported by any combination of agencies, including vocational rehabilitation, developmental disabilities, behavioral health, the public workforce system, Centers for Independent Living, community rehabilitation agencies, education, and others. The LEAD Center and National Disability Institute staff will team up with Oregon VR, Department of Education, students and employers discuss the pilot projects it has supported in Oregon that used Guided Group Discovery to serve as an alternative assessment tool that identifies the strengths and ideal conditions of employment for job seekers with disabilities. GGD assists people in securing and maintaining employment by supporting them in small groups to create their own individual "Blueprint for Employment" to guide their job search process. GGD, like other forms of Discovery, serves as the cornerstone for customized employment. Projects in Tennessee and Philadelphia will be highlighted and all tools will be shared with participants.


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:45am - 10:15am
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:45am

Implementing College and Career Readiness: Critical Dimensions for Youth with Significant Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

This session presents results from a Delphi study among experts who reached consensus on critical dimensions of college and career readiness for students with significant disabilities. The end results were the development of an inclusive framework for supporting students to achieve quality of life outcomes. This session aligns with the TASH theme of innovation for inclusive lives because the research identifies how inclusive secondary experiences lead to the skills and opportunities needed to support students to be college and career ready.

Presenters
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Professor, Portland State University


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:45am - 10:15am
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:45am

Translating Policy into Practice: Federal Initiatives that Impact CIE & HCBS
Limited Capacity seats available

TBA


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:45am - 10:15am
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:15am

An Ongoing Journey from Compliance to Alliance
Limited Capacity seats available

Total Living Concept (TLC), a non profit in Kent, WA, participated in an amazing journey, titled, Compliance to Alliance, developed by Jennifer White and taught by Jennifer White and Amelia Pineda-Gross. TLC is a service organization assisting people who experience ID/DD with living a full life, obtaining meaningful employment and becoming valued members of the local community. As an agency, TLC is person centered and equity focused but we were missing so many things. Jennifer and Amelia introduced a very focused social justice lens, giving a brighter perspective and many tools to provide supports for a higher level of independence and engagement for the person in their life. Come hear about our journey and the radical differences we have been able to see in people's lives. We will share video presentations from the people who are living the experience and discuss our progress in this journey. We are committed to using this lens for the whole agency.


Wednesday November 28, 2018 10:15am - 12:00pm
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:15am

Intimacy and Relationships: Supporting People with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Everyone, including people with individuals with intellectual disabilities, has the right to understand and learn about their sexuality including physical, emotional, and social development or concerns. People have the right to learn about sexuality in a manner that is understandable, supportive and non-judgmental. People with intellectual disabilities should be able to live their life in the community free of fear, shame, and without being exploited. This session will provide participants with creative strategies for supporting people with disabilities to enhance their knowledge and understanding about sexuality, intimacy and relationships.

Presenters

Wednesday November 28, 2018 10:15am - 12:00pm
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:15am

Rethinking Access: Innovative Curricular Adaptations
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with the 2018 theme, 'Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life,' by equipping participants with knowledge of how to apply innovative adaptation strategies to create accessible general education curriculum for all students. During this session, participants will have the opportunity to creatively find solutions for adapting curriculum, thereby ensuring an equitable education for all students. We must allow ourselves to think outside the box if we are to develop successful inclusive environments. This hands-on, interactive presentation provides an understanding of universal design for learning and curricular adaptations while highlighting the importance of collaboration. Peer supports and technology supports will be emphasized as an integral part in developing creative avenues for student access. Practical planning tools that facilitate equitable instructional delivery and assessment of learning will be shared. Rethinking access to the general education curriculum requires flexibility, creativity, and determination and can pave the way for meaningful inclusive schooling.

Presenters
avatar for Rebecca Brooks

Rebecca Brooks

Assistant Profressor, California State University San Marco
Dr. Rebecca Brooks is an Assistant Professor in the Special Education teacher preparation and graduate program in the School of Education at California State University San Marcos. She has worked with individuals with disabilities in educational, recreational, vocational, and residential... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 10:15am - 12:00pm
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:30am

Engaging Families and Elevating Expectations: A Focus on Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

Families of youth with significant disabilities may have difficulty thinking about the transition to adulthood and envisioning a future that includes competitive employment. This workshop will highlight strategies for engaging families of youth, including those with significant disabilities around planning for employment. Innovative parent training efforts will be discussed as will the need to engage around specific outcomes and ideas for working with families who are apprehensive about exploring employment options for their youth. Also discussed will be the role expectations play in how families and professionals view employment and transition options.

Presenters
avatar for Sean Roy

Sean Roy

Training Associate, TransCen
State Liaison for the YES! Center and lead staff on the RRTC on VR Practices and Youth. I am an experienced trainer with a focus on transition age youth and family engagement.


Wednesday November 28, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:30am

Successful Employment Transition Programming and Work-Based Learning Experiences for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

National unemployment for persons with disabilities is three times greater than for the average population, with only 17.9% of people with a disability age 16 year and older employed in the United States. Community Options' Employment Transition Program, Work-Based Learning Experiences, and Self-Advocacy curriculum give individuals with disabilities the tools they need to overcome this statistic, so they may work in a community-based, integrated setting at a competitive employment opportunity. This presentation will provide participants with an overview of the components of Community Options' Employment Transition Program, Work-Based Learning Experiences, and Self-Advocacy Curriculum. Then, it will share some of the successful experiences of individuals served by Community Options and these programs. After attending this session, participants will be able to identify components of a successful employment transition program, list community resources that will help their organization build a successful employment transition program, work-based learning experiences, and self-advocacy curriculum, and they will understand how well-developed self-advocacy skills enable individuals with disabilities to secure and thrive in community-based competitive employment opportunities.

Presenters

Wednesday November 28, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:30am

The Economic Impact of Customized Employment for Participating Employers
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation is based on a study contracted by The Department of Labor Office of Disability and Employment Policy (ODEP) of employers who have hired individuals with disabilities into customized jobs. Join this presentation and discussion on how to offer employers innovative solutions through customized jobs that have a positive economic impact on the business's operation. Based on input from employers, learn creative ways to assess employer's labor needs that creates employment opportunities for job seekers with more significant barriers to employment. Through this study, employers have provided estimates of the economic benefits they have received when working with local employment programs.

Presenters
avatar for Richard Davis

Richard Davis

Policy Advisor, Office of Disability Employment Policy


Wednesday November 28, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

How to Advocate for Housing for Yourself and Others
Limited Capacity seats available

How to Advocate for Housing for Yourself and Others. 1. Learn Housing 101 including about the different types of income-based housing. 2. Learn the basic steps to helping someone find housing; rental and ownership. 3. Learn about housing trends you can use that promote inclusion of People with Disabilities. 4. Resources for finding housing 5. Hear stories and ask questions from an advocate who has been doing and teaching housing advocacy for 20 years.

Presenters
avatar for Cheri Mitchell

Cheri Mitchell

Advocate/Member, GA ADvocacy Office/ People First of GA
Cheri Mitchell is first and foremost a Self-Advocate. She has spent the last twenty years working on behalf of people with disabilities and people who are elderly, and mentoring and supporting self-advocates across Georgia and the nation. She is dedicated to helping people get out... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

The Unique Grief Process for Parents
Limited Capacity seats available

Attendees will learn about the unique grief process experienced by parents when raising a child with a disability, and come away with tools to assist the families they work with in seeing that experiencing grief does not mean you don't love your child - it enables you to accept your child more fully. Though we love our children and accept their disability as natural, there are times when their exclusion from society and community causes pain for us (sometimes more than our children). Learning how to grieve enables us to live healthier, happier lives, and to be better advocates for our children. The presentation includes quotes from others who work in this field about the importance of recognizing that the grief which comes from experiencing our children's exclusion from society and the lack of adequate supports is ongoing and not dysfunctional.

Presenters
SC

Susan Cushman

Family Support Director, United Cerebral Palsy
Resources, funding sources, obtaining county services -- for their child with a disability. I'm the parent of a 25 year old daughter with cerebral palsy (and a 24 year old stepson with Down syndrome).


Wednesday November 28, 2018 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

Creating an Effective Employer Engagement Program: Our Story of Advancing Employment First
Limited Capacity seats available

This session details the journey of Dirkse Counseling and Consulting, an employment provider in Oregon, who harnessed the power of community to develop and implement an innovative cutting-edge employer engagement program entitled, Amplify Success! This program is designed to inspire and equip employers to create a workplace culture of inclusion that encourages thinking outside the box when it comes to hiring, training and supervising people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities and teaches employers to see Ability vs Disability. With 20 years of bridging the gap between job seekers with disabilities and employers, Dirkse Counseling and Consulting understand that employer fear, unconscious bias and lack of knowledge of how to see ability often sabotage an employer's desire to hire these applicants. Until recently, with passage of WIOA, many employment providers and vocational rehabilitation agencies have not formally recognized the importance of focusing on the needs of employers when job developing for people with disabilities. While quality individualized job placements is a primary focus, building an equipped network of employers who are ready to hire and integrate people with IDD into their workforce, is also crucial to positive and sustainable outcomes. This breakout session aligns well with this year's TASH theme of, "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life," because creating quality, diverse and inclusive employment opportunities for people with IDD and other disabilities requires that support professionals get creative and seek innovative solutions like Amplify Success! to engage employers at a deeper level.

Presenters
avatar for Cindy Bahl

Cindy Bahl

Business Development Manager, Dirkse Counseling and Consulting (D
My passion is matching jobs seekers with business needs and I do this by learning more about the business so that I might be a resource for disability diversity inclusion in the workplace.
avatar for Heidi Dirkse-Graw

Heidi Dirkse-Graw

President/CEO, Dikrse Counseling & Consulting, Inc.
Heidi is President and CEO of Dirkse Counseling & Consulting, Inc., a company of 23 employees who mission is to bridge the gap between job seekers who experience disability and business by seeking both-win solutions to meet business need. | | In the last two years, Heidi and... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

Expanding Employment Opportunities for Youth
Limited Capacity seats available

Competitive Employment, Supported Employment, Customized Employment¦why do we forget everything we know about good job search strategies when it comes to job seekers with disabilities? Employment is a relationship between two parties (the employer and job seeker) and our job is to effectively create a win-win for both the business and job seeker with disability. Work is a central part of adult life, often consuming as much as half of one's waking hours. Having a job contributes to meaningful, productive lives, especially for people with disabilities. But today, students with disabilities are more likely to experience unemployment or underemployment, lower pay, and job dissatisfaction, compared to their nondisabled peers. Thus, it is critical to provide young adults with disabilities employment experiences while they are still in school so they may be exposed to job opportunities as early as possible, increasing their likelihood of obtaining employment after leaving high school. As Employment/Transition Consultants, we must develop and implement a flexible process designed to individualize employment relationships between a job seeker and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. This presentation will discuss ways identifying the interests and strengths of a job seeker is as critical as identifying the needs of a business. The presentation will also discuss basic business practices and provide examples of how employment and transition professionals can utilize those strategies in developing employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Presenters

Wednesday November 28, 2018 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

YES! Center: What does systems change look like on the ground?
Limited Capacity seats available

Successful systems change happens when all stakeholders engage in meaningful activities that break down barriers to full inclusion. Whether top down or bottom up, states still utilize strategies that fit their unique geographical and policy landscapes. Since 2011, the Administration for Community Living (ACL) has funded 14 states to carry out systems change through their Partnerships in Employment (PIE) initiatives. For the past two years, the Youth Employment Solutions Center (YES! Center) has worked with 8 states to design and carry individualized approaches to improve employment outcomes for transition aged youth. During this session, YES! Center leadership will share the progress being made and forthcoming technical assistance activities including partnering with states outside of the ACL/PIE initiatives.

Presenters
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy... Read More →
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Project Manager, Youth Employment Solutions Center / National TASH


Wednesday November 28, 2018 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

Chapter Leadership Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

TBA

Moderators
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Wednesday November 28, 2018 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

Innovative Approaches in Teacher Education and Professional Development
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of the annual TASH Research Colloquium is to provide information about current research that addresses topics of interest to TASH members. One of the most important priorities in our field is to identify innovative teacher education and professional development practices. To ensure that the individuals with extensive support needs are provided with quality educational and other life span services, it is important that special education majors, teachers, paraprofessionals, and support personnel are informed and remain current about effective personnel preparation and professional development practices.

This research colloquium will host a variety of presenters who will be sharing information about several innovative teacher preparation and professional development approaches and models.

Among the speakers will be Andrea Ruppar University of Wisconsin-Madison), Carly Roberts University of Washington), and Amy Olson Winona State University) who will discuss developing the expertise of teachers of students with extensive support needs (“It’s Not All About Loving the Kids”); Canyon Hardesty and Eric Moody (WIND, University of Wyoming) who will discuss ECHO, an innovative videoconferencing forum that supports and targets training to an interdisciplinary team of professionals working in rural areas (“University of Wyoming ECHO: Enhancing Professional Learning and Development for Educators”); Richard Carter (University of Wyoming) will discuss microcredentialing- non-traditional, professional development units (specific competencies) that offer skill instruction at granular levels; Peggy Weiss and Kelley Regan will discuss “bug-in-the-ear” coaching that provides real-time and immediate feedback to participants; and Meg Kamman (CEEDAR Center, University of Florida) who will discuss how the CEEDAR Center supports effective educator development for inclusion.

Diane Ryndak (University of North Carolina Greensboro) will serve as the discussant for the colloquium.

Moderators
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at... Read More →

Presenters
MC

Meg Camman

University of Florida
RC

Richard Carter

University of Wyoming
CH

Canyon Hardesty

University of Wyoming
EM

Eric Moody

University of Wyoming
CR

Carly Roberts

University of Washington
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Wednesday November 28, 2018 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

Boldly Including EVERYONE: Positive Approaches for People with Behavior Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

At KFI, we believe that supports for people with intellectual disabilities must focus on full community participation; with opportunities to work, live and play alongside neighbors. Yet, we are often confronted with the assumption that people with significant behavior challenges are "not ready" for those opportunities. It is typically our own fear and uncertainty that create this barrier. Yet, this struggle between safety and opportunity is all too real. Innovative solutions, along with a good dose of courage, are required to support ALL people to live inclusive lives. Loneliness and isolation may be the single biggest contributors to challenging behavior. We often witness people who are struggling to fit into their communities living lives that are increasingly separate. The way they communicate their loneliness is something we are uncomfortable with. We err on the side of safety, and hope we can figure it out in time. We try lots of things. We get stuck. We keep seeking a solution, and we keep trying to make the person's world safer!¦ which usually makes it smaller. Meanwhile we are waiting to get people into their community until we "fix" the problem. What if the community is part of the cure? We have to stop waiting to be ready. It is time, now, to bravely put ourselves and the people we support on the path to community. Brace yourself. There is no "right" answer or magic potion. There is no super-professional to come in and fix it. There is only you, the person you are supporting, and their team; and you are enough! This presentation will look at ways to move forward when teams get stuck supporting people with significantly challenging behaviors. Participants will learn the components of a Positive Support Plan, and leave with a template to try. For people with challenging behaviors, a Positive Support Plan is a living document that gives voice to both fears and possibilities for living a meaningful life. Participants will acquire tools and strategies, along with the courage to implement bolder supports for people with challenging behavior. ALL people should have opportunities to work, live and play alongside their neighbors.

Presenters
avatar for Gail Fanjoy

Gail Fanjoy

CEO, KFI
2016 TASH Award Winner (Barbara R. Trader Leadership Award) Gail Fanjoy is CEO of KFI (Katahdin Friends, Inc.), an agency which provides supports for people with disabilities in the areas of community employment, supported living, and community life engagement in Maine.  Having worked... Read More →
avatar for Lyann Grogan

Lyann Grogan

Hiring & Training Coordinator, KFI
After ten years of working in a segregated Mental Health setting as a Music Therapist at New Hampshire Hospital and serving as a member of the National Music Therapy Association’s Training Committee LyAnn found inspiration. She was inspired by KFI's mission to provide supports... Read More →
avatar for Laurie Kimball

Laurie Kimball

Director, KFI South, KFI
Laurie has made a career of facilitating support for people with disabilities to live real lives and participate in socially valued lifestyles in their communities. Laurie's passions are for positive approaches to challenging behavior, person centered services and building community... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:45pm

Growth Through Opportunity (GTO) Cadets Program
Limited Capacity seats available

The highly unique, national award winning GTO Cadets training program is mutually beneficial for individuals with disabilities and first responders. The one-of-a-kind, dual purpose GTO Cadets program enhances vocational and independent living skills for individuals with I/DD while simultaneously increasing disabilities awareness training for local first responders. The outcome for uniformed GTO Cadets with I/DD is empowerment and community-based employment. The outcome for first responders is empowerment and enhanced professional development producing positive outcomes during future real world encounters. A true win-win!

Presenters
avatar for Travis Akins

Travis Akins

Founder & CEO, Growth Through Opportunity
Travis Akins is the Founder & Creator of the mutually beneficial Growth Through Opportunity (GTO) Cadets training program for individuals with I/DD and first responders alike. GTO is officially endorsed by the National Sheriffs’ Association and proudly awarded the 2017 Champion... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:45pm

An Exploration of Supported Decision-Making: Lessons Learned from Pilot Projects
Limited Capacity seats available

The Center for Public Representation has initiated six Supported Decision-Making pilot projects, consulted with other pilots, and has established a Supported Decision-Making training and technical assistance center in Massachusetts. The Center's initial pilot was one of the first in the United States. Supported Decision-Making has been a transformative option for the people we have worked with. However, to successfully use the model, we must confront and address the challenging issues that arise with the use of Supported Decision-Making. Such issues include: selection of supporters (including use of paid staff as supporters); the dignity of risk; interactions with health care providers and other third parties; cultural norms; use of the model in states without a Supported Decision-Making law; and degree of disability. In this workshop, we will offer practical, creative, and culturally competent solutions to these complex issues based on our experience operating our Supported Decision-Making pilot projects. The workshop will be in three parts: (1) Describing Center for Public Representation's work with individuals with disabilities, families, and agencies on Supported Decision-Making, (2) Discussion of what has been learned from these experiences and the challenging issues that have arisen, using the stories of participants in our pilots, and (3) Appraising implications for future work on Supported Decision-Making.

Presenters
avatar for Michael Kendrick

Michael Kendrick

Director, Kendrick Consulting International


Wednesday November 28, 2018 2:45pm - 5:00pm
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:45pm

You are the Leader You Have Been Waiting For! Leadership, Kindness and a Culture of Gentleness
Limited Capacity seats available

Many of us cast about looking for someone to show us the way, not realizing we already have the skills we need to be leaders in our own right. We may find ourselves asking “how we can all grow as leaders in our own lives and the lives of others?” As supportive leaders, we can nurture a culture of kindness and connectedness that creates a fertile ground for people to build relationships. In this session, we will examine the principles of a Culture of Gentleness and how they can assist in developing our own leadership skills, as well as the skills of others. We will explore how we can utilize The Central Purpose and the 6 Elements of a Culture of Gentleness to deepen our understanding of leadership. Join us for an interactive hour of conversation and fun, where we will explore what qualities of a good leader or mentor are and define the kind of leaders we want and need to be. Utilizing The Central Purpose and the 6 Elements of a Culture of Gentleness, participants will be able to evaluate how these principles can inform their leadership style.

Presenters
avatar for Shelley Nessman

Shelley Nessman

In the Company of Others
avatar for Sheldon Schwitek

Sheldon Schwitek

Founder, In the Company of Others


Wednesday November 28, 2018 2:45pm - 5:00pm
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:15pm

Inclusive Media: Sensitive & Insightful Use of Documentation
Limited Capacity seats available

This instruction will sensitive it's participants to the Art and Tech of observation and documentation. It will highlight the power of images and show examples of how to conduct oneself and document social and educational situations in a non intrusive, sensitive way which is real and powerful, and where the visuals express the values of inclusion. How to capture and present videos that can teach and inspire. The presenter is a film maker with visual disabilities and has been documenting Inclusion since 1991. Creator of the award winning The Inclusion Series, and many other films specializing in social emotional issues, wellness and education. www.comforty.com, www.the-learning-projects.org


Wednesday November 28, 2018 3:15pm - 5:00pm
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:30pm

Progress and Needs for Employment of People with Significant Disabilities: Revisiting the Work of the WIOA Advisory Committee on Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment for Individuals with Disabilities (ACICIEID)
Limited Capacity seats available

Employment of people with significant disabilities remains and important goal and a concern of TASH and the entire disability community. Some progress is evident. More than 40 states have Employment First Policy or Legislation. States across the country are participating in national projects to improve employment outcomes. At the same there are concerns that the pace for increasing integrated employment outcomes is slow and greater investment is needed at the state and national levels.

In 2016, the ACICEID issue its Final Report focused on Building Capacity to deliver competitive integrated employment (CIE) outcomes nationwide and about the use of sub-minimum wages.
https://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/pdf/ACICIEID_Final_Report_9-8-16.pdf

Since the 2016 report was issued, meetings continue at the federal level in several departments of the government. States have taken notice of the report’s recommendations that can be adopted at the state level. In 2017 there was a Bi-partisan, Bi-cameral Congressional Briefing, and a Senate Hearing about CIE and the Committees Recommendation.

The purpose of this session is to revisit the Recommendations of the Committee and discuss progress that is emerging about CIE outcomes and to discuss concerns and needs for improving outcomes.

Members of the Committee that will participate in this Panel discussion include:
David Mank, Professor Emeritus, Indiana University (moderator)
Valerie (Vicki) Brooke, Project Director, RRTC on Employer Practices, Virginia Commonwealth University
Cesilee Coulson, Executive Director, Washington Initiative for Supported Employment (WISE)
Oswald "Oz" Mondejar, Senior Vice President for Partners Continuing Care, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network
Ruby Moore, Executive Director, Georgia Advocacy Office

Moderators
avatar for David Mank

David Mank

Professor Emeritus, Indiana University
David Michael Mank, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus at Indiana University. He is formerly the Director of the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community at Indiana University, Indiana’s University Center for Excellence on Disabilities.As a writer and researcher, Dr. Mank has an... Read More →

Presenters
avatar for Valerie (Vicki) Brooke

Valerie (Vicki) Brooke

Project Director, RRTC on Employer Practices, Virginia Commonwealth University
Valerie Brooke, M.Ed has been a faculty member at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and working in the field of employment for individuals with disabilities for over thirty five years. Ms. Brooke is the Project Director for the RRTC on Employer Practices, Director of Training... Read More →
avatar for Cesilee Coulson

Cesilee Coulson

Executive Director, Washington Initiative for Supported Employment (WISE)
avatar for Oswald

Oswald "Oz" Mondejar

Vice President of Talent Management, Partners HealthCare
Oz Mondejar is the Vice President of Talent Management at Partners HealthCare. He also serves as the Senior Vice President of Mission and Advocacy for Partners Continuing Care, Inc. (“PCC”), the non-acute care services division of Partners HealthCare. Oz works at the intersection... Read More →
avatar for Ruby Moore

Ruby Moore

Executive Director, Georgia Advocacy Office
Ruby Moore is the Executive Director of the Georgia Advocacy Office, the designated Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities in Georgia. Moore is nationally known for her work in the disability field over the past 35 years, particularly in the areas of employment... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:00pm

Exhibit Hall Opens!
Be sure to stop by the Exhibit Hall (Salon A) to support organizations and small businesses that practice inclusion across the country.

Wednesday November 28, 2018 4:00pm - 7:00pm
Salon A - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:45pm

Employment Extravaganza
Come celebrate and marvel at a fantastic procession of employees and employers - a fantastic extravaganza that must be believed in order to be seen!  You will experience a human cantilever of workers, employers and the supports that helped to make this vision into a reality. This event promises to be an acrobatic balance of the dignity of labor, civil rights and persistence - a vibrant representation of achievement!

Presenters
avatar for Cesilee Coulson

Cesilee Coulson

Executive Director, Washington Initiative for Supported Employment (WISE)


Wednesday November 28, 2018 4:45pm - 5:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:00pm

Continue the Conversation: Employment Reception 
Join us during the Employment Reception to continue the conversation. This reception is open to all Wednesday Workshop participants, conference attendees and guest employers. Come enjoy light refreshments, network, and learn more about national employment initiatives!

Thank you to our reception sponsor, Walmart!

Sponsors
avatar for Walmart

Walmart

Thank you, Walmart, for sponsoring Thursday's employment reception and conference scholarships.


Wednesday November 28, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Salon F - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

7:00pm

Film Festival
In addition to the hundreds of outstanding presentations, you'll also have an opportunity to experience the fine art of film making at the 2018 TASH Conference.

Thank you to our film festival sponsor - Community Options, Inc.

Moderators
avatar for Donald Taylor

Donald Taylor

Membership & Chapters Manager, TASH

Sponsors
avatar for Community Options, Inc.

Community Options, Inc.

Community Options, Inc. was incorporated on February 9, 1989 to develop residential and employment supports for people with severe disabilities. Since its inception, Community Options has been devoted to serving individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, thus cultivating... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201
 
Thursday, November 29
 

7:00am

Registration Open
Check in and get your name badge here! Registration will be open during these hours.

Thank you to our lanyard sponsor, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network!

Sponsors
avatar for Spaulding Rehabilitation Network

Spaulding Rehabilitation Network

A member of Partners HealthCare, the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network includes Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, as well as Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Cape Cod, Spaulding Hospital Cambridge and Spaulding Nursing and Therapy Center Brighton, as well as twenty-five outpatient... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 7:00am - 6:00pm
Registration Desk - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Relaxation Room
A low-sensory relaxation room is available for all TASH conference attendees; located on the Lobby level near the escalators.

Thursday November 29, 2018 8:00am - 5:00pm
Willamette - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Exhibit Hall
Stop by the Exhibit Hall (Salon A) during these hours to support small businesses and organizations that practice inclusion across the country.

Thank you to our morning coffee sponsor, Public Consulting Group!

Sponsors
avatar for Public Consulting Group

Public Consulting Group

Founded in 1986 and headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, PCG helps primarily public sector health, education, and human services organizations make measurable improvements to their performance and processes.At PCG, we’re passionate about getting results for our clients. Because... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 8:00am - 7:00pm
Salon A - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:15am

Opening General Session
8:15 - 8:30 AM: Opening Remarks

8:30 - 8:45 AM: The Power of One: Becoming an Influencer for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion 
(Megan Hoorn and Sarah Mueller)
As siblings of sisters with disabilities, we will share our stories of growing up as sisters and our sisters' perspectives of living with a disability. Our storytelling piece will capture the challenging questions faced by us, our other siblings, and our sisters, and the emerged answers that shed light on the only life we know. The experiences shared will reflect how the power of one individual can evolve oneself and others to be influencers of change for equity, opportunity, and inclusion.

8:45 - 9:30 AM: Confronting Our Disability Biases: Moving Beyond Low Expectations
(Emily Ladau)
Holding low expectations for people with disabilities is a form of prejudice that’s all too common. Even as informed, empowered advocates and allies, we can still fall into the trap of making assumptions about what we, or the people we love, teach, and/or support, are capable of doing. This can cause a cycle of self-doubt within people with disabilities, and lead to unintentional barriers. Together, we will explore the biases we have about disabilities, talk about how to move beyond them, and embrace the importance of having high expectations for all of us.

Presenters
avatar for Megan Hoorn

Megan Hoorn

Huron Valley Schools
Megan Hoorn is a sibling to her younger sister, Brenna (as well as four younger brothers). Megan graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in speech-language pathology from Eastern Michigan University. She then graduated with a Master of Science degree in communication sciences... Read More →
avatar for Emily Ladau

Emily Ladau

Communications Consultant & Speaker, Words I Wheel By
I am a passionate disability rights activist, writer, speaker, and digital communications consultant whose career began at the age of 10, when I appeared on several episodes of Sesame Street to educate children about life with a physical disability. A native of Long Island, New York... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Mueller

Sarah Mueller

UCEDD Trainee, Institute on Disabilities at Temple University
Sarah Mueller is a sibling to her younger sister, Rachel. Having graduated in 2014 with a Bachelor of Science degree in K-12 Special Education and Secondary Mathematics from Eastern Michigan University, she served as a high school special education teacher for students with intellectual... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 8:15am - 9:30am
Salon E/F - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:44am

About Breakout Sessions
Breakout Presentations are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Thursday November 29, 2018 9:44am - 5:15pm
All Meeting Floors

9:45am

Advances in Evaluation of Inclusive Post Secondary Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Post-secondary education is a relatively new option for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Although it has been explored in Canada for nearly 20 years (Uditsky, Hughson, & Elizabeth, 2012), the U.S. experience is nascent. The first attempts at evaluation have been encouraging, but primarily qualitative and aimed largely at employment as the outcome. The leadership at the Millersville University TPSID team decided that evaluation should be rigorous, quantitative, and aimed at broader quality of life and "things that really matter" dimensions. The work began in 2016. Instruments were derived and adapted from prior studies of deinstitutionalization, supported employment, and self-determination (Conroy, 2018). The instruments have been tested and applied in the early phases of the Millersville TPSID program, with high success and excellent internal consistency reliability. Now the University of Kansas has joined in the quality of life evaluation efforts. Recently an article appeared in a major journal calling for exactly the kind of work Millersville began two years ago: Kathleen Sheppard-Jones, Harold Kleinert, Laura Butler, and Barry Whaley (2018). Life Outcomes and Higher Education: The Need for Longitudinal Research Using a Broad Range of Quality of Life Indicators. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 2018, Vol. 56, No. 1, 69-74.

Presenters
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Professor, Portland State University


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

AveNEWS of Success: Innovative Ideas, One Person at a Time
Limited Capacity seats available

Three to four self-advocates will share their personal stories on how they built their meaningful days of paid & volunteer work and community involvement, developed micro-enterprises from scratch (two cases), along with innovative ideas and strategies to promote informed choice and success. Avenues SLS will also share how a recommitment to the use of systematic instruction has led to significant improvements in improving independence in the lives of people they support and has helped demonstrate how SLS staff are Instructional Coaches, and not simply care-providers.

Presenters
avatar for Scott Shepard

Scott Shepard

Director, Avenues Supported Living Services
Scott Shepard is the Executive Director of Avenues Supported Living Services, a non-profit agency which provides community living and personalized day supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in North Los Angeles County. With Avenues SLS, we had the opportunity... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Building Systems Change to Support Employment and Community Integration
Limited Capacity seats available

Creating state systems that support employment and community integration for people with intellectual disabilities requires change at every level, from the very first conversation we have with people and their families, to the waiver services we offer, to how we work with vocational rehabilitation and other community partners. In the District of Columbia, we are engaged in a multi-year effort to reframe our entire system to advance employment and support ongoing opportunities for community integration. We will discuss how person-centered thinking formed the foundation of our systems change efforts; early positive results; the challenges we have faced along the way; as well as next steps to support employment first.

Presenters
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Salmon - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Everyone is a Triathlete! Community Partnership in an All Abilities Event!
Limited Capacity seats available

Learn about the All Ability Tri4Youth, the first all-inclusive youth triathlon in Oregon. Explore this new program concept that unites the desire of community recreation partner, Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District, to be more accessible and inclusive and FACT Oregon, a non profit family organization that encourages families to connect in their community, as they share how they coordinated an exciting all-ability event. Discover approaches to working with community partners to create environments that celebrate the strength of all participants, with or without disabilities.


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Fair Housing Rights and Enforcement
Limited Capacity seats available

The Fair Housing Act (FHA) prohibits discrimination in the sale or rental of housing. People with disabilities are given additional protections under fair housing laws. Since the passage the FHA, housing discrimination has become harder to detect. This workshop will give an overview of the FHA, and detail the Disability Law Center's fair housing program and its enforcement efforts in Utah.

Presenters
avatar for Vard McGuire

Vard McGuire

Fair Housing Coordinator, Disability Law Center


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Eugene - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

High Expectations and Collaboration: The Foundation for Innovation During Transition
Limited Capacity seats available

Transitioning from high school to adulthood is difficult for many young adults with disabilities (U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, 2017). Many students with disabilities have lower rates of diploma attainment (Hendricks & Wehman, 2009), employment (U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018), participation in postsecondary education or training programs (Grigal et al., 2011), and independent living outside of the family home (Hendricks & Wehman, 2009), as compared to young adults without disabilities. However, individualized transition planning embodied by high expectations and collaboration among students with disabilities, families, and professionals can improve positive post-school outcomes of students with disabilities (Francis et al., 2018; Haber et al., 2016; Wehman, 2013). While there is substantial research on what constitutes effective individualized transition planning, we have far less knowledge of expectations. How do we define high expectations? And from where or by whom are our expectations developed and influenced? What influence does culture have on expectations? This session will feature 3 panel presenters from differing backgrounds who will (a) provide an overview of the research on expectations among key collaborative stakeholders such as individuals with disabilities, educators, service providers, and caregivers; (b) present research-based and practical methods for enhancing expectations and collaboration during transition; and (c) facilitate participant conversation related to their perceptions of and influencers of high expectations and what it means to them.

Presenters
avatar for Sean Roy

Sean Roy

Training Associate, TransCen
State Liaison for the YES! Center and lead staff on the RRTC on VR Practices and Youth. I am an experienced trainer with a focus on transition age youth and family engagement.


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Meadowlark - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Lessons Learned from Oregon's Peer to Peer Employment Project
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2016, Oregon began an ambitious peer support project to confirm our state's commitment to moving people out of sheltered workshops into community employment. The project was based on the idea that many people who receive services and their families were confused about the changes and they did not have the information to make decisions for themselves. In response, we developed a curriculum with input from supported employment leaders, self-advocates, family members and others based on the idea that that people with disabilities are the experts in their own lives and that everyone can work at "Real Jobs at Real Pay." Two years later, we have finished our project and we have exciting stories to share, lessons we have learned and tools to provide to others ready to move forward with implementing a peer support model in their states!


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Douglas/Fir - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Maximizing Academic Access, Expectations and Learning: Creating Systems Change
Limited Capacity seats available

Project MAX is an endeavor by the state of Pennsylvania to increase access to the general education curriculum for all students, with a specific focus on students with complex instructional needs. Too often, schools and parents of students with complex instruction needs have limited expectations about what these students can and should be learning and achieving. Presuming competence, supporting meaningful communication, and providing access to the general education curriculum are foundational for educational experiences that extend beyond functional skills for students with complex support needs. This session will highlight two critical aspects of Project MAX, the innovative statewide parent network designed to engage parents and families in raising expectations for all learners and how one university is including the Project MAX concepts in teacher-candidate and leader-candidate preparation programs. Both of these aspects are crucial for long-term systems change related to students with complex instructional needs. First, The Project MAX Parent Network is a collaborative effort between Parent Education Advocacy and Leadership Center (the Pennsylvania OSEP-funded Parent Training and Information Center), HUNE (a Community Parent Resource Center) and the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network. The purpose of the network is to build collaborative relationships between families and school teams to increase their expectations for students with complex instructional needs. Additionally, the network is committed to demonstrating that all students can learn and be engaged in rigorous academic content when provided innovative instruction. The Project MAX Parent Network is comprised of XXX of parents across Pennsylvania, has produced XXX products and more importantly, is transforming both parent and student lives. Shared norms, clear and compassionate communication as well as collective knowledge is vital to the success of the partnership. Second, Drexel University will highlight its approach to embedding the content of Project MAX into its teacher preparation and leadership preparation programs. Content regarding Universal Design for learning, presuming competence, engaging parents, supporting communication and providing access to the general education curriculum are included within all coursework with specific attention in the Low Incidence course of the Special Education Program. One of the required assignments for all students is the development and implementation of a lesson plan that provides students with complex learning needs access to grade level content. Course syllabi, sample lessons, and key learning will be shared. Attendees will learn replicable strategies that work in building partnerships between schools and parents, will develop a working understanding of the Project MAX and its innovative instructional approaches, review the training modules that support the Project MAX Parent Network and leave with an understanding of why parents and universities are critical for systems change.

Presenters
avatar for Janet Sloand

Janet Sloand

Associate Clinical Professor, Special Education, Drexel University


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Belmont - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Perspectives on Inclusive Education: Themes and Trends of the Literature
Limited Capacity seats available

Fostering social connectedness and meaningful participation is essential to the success of inclusive educational programming. Such belonging often hinges on the support and facilitation provided by education professionals. The current study systematically evaluates the literature on education professionals' perceptions of and attitudes towards inclusive education. The presentation is well aligned with the 2018 TASH theme "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life." An individual's educational career is a significant portion of their life and provides the foundation for successful community integration in adult life. The focus of the proposed presentation is to provide an overview of themes and trends in the extant literature related to attitudes and perceptions of inclusive education in attempt to help the field realize progress made and areas of need in establishing full inclusion of all students with disabilities. We believe a first step in addressing many of the social injustices faced by students with severe disabilities in school settings is understanding the voices of the various stakeholders involved in the implementation of inclusive education, both historical trends and emerging themes. TASH envisions, that "all individuals with disabilities enjoy individualized supports and a quality of life similar to that available to all people" and we feel that the proposed session is a building block toward achieving this vision.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Hawthorne - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Preparing Paraprofessionals to Deliver Evidence-Based Instruction that Improves Student Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

Many students with severe disabilities receive at least some instruction from special education paraprofessionals. Paraprofessionals receive strikingly limited training in evidence-based instructional strategies. This lack of training is neither fair to students with severe disabilities nor the paraprofessionals themselves. In this study, we tested the efficacy of a low-intensity, high-quality training for paraprofessionals on evidence-based systematic instructional strategies (i.e., simultaneous prompting, least-to-most prompting, and systematic data collection). Paraprofessionals implemented these strategies under the direction and supervision of special education etchers across both special education and general education classrooms. We randomized 17 paraprofessionals to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received one hour of training per week for four weeks. Training emphasized the most promising professional development strategies: explicit modeling, constructive feedback, and an implementation checklist detailing all steps of each procedure. The training group significantly and substantially outperformed the control group when implementing simultaneous prompting (d = 0.91) and least-to-most prompting (d = 1.56). Students who received instruction from paraprofessionals in the training group made more progress than those in the control group (d = 0.29).

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Social Problem Solving: A Bridge from Learned Skills to Application in Real-Life
Limited Capacity seats available

A primary reason for losing a job or not succeeding in post secondary education for students with autism is a lack of social / interpersonal skills. Social ties and interactions make our lives more productive and increase the quality of life. This presentation will discuss a process of social problem solving being piloted in both post-secondary education and employment that teaches young adults with disability-related social barriers, the skills and means to apply these skills in order to maintain success in education and employment, increasing their likelihood of increased quality of life experiences.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Portland - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Supported Decision-Making: A Listening Session
Limited Capacity seats available

The National Resource Center for Supported Decision-Making ("SDM"), funded by the Administration for Community Living, advances SDM through research, training, information sharing, and promotion of best practices. SDM assists older adults and people with disabilities in receiving the help they want and need to make their own decisions. We will share the major advances in the use of SDM and gather feedback on what more progress is needed. This interactive session is an opportunity to assess the challenges and opportunities for using SDM in your work.

Presenters
avatar for Morgan Whitlatch

Morgan Whitlatch

Legal Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
Morgan K. Whitlatch is the Legal Director of the Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, an independent, non-profit advocacy organization that has been advancing the interests of D.C. residents with developmental disabilities since 2002. Morgan has devoted her legal career... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Walking the Talk of Presuming Competence
Limited Capacity seats available

In the world of augmentative/alternative communication (AAC), the “presumption of competence” is seen as a core guiding principle for supporting a person who uses AAC. Putting this principle into practice on an everyday basis often requires communication partners to change their beliefs and assumptions about disability and intelligence, and to develop a more expanded view of communication as a gateway to community inclusion and participation. The presenters will provide ideas on how to what communication partners can learn to think “outside of the box” of their existing beliefs about communication and move to a place where they are demonstrating the presumption of competence in their daily interactions with AAC users. A self-advocate will share examples from his personal experiences as an AAC user of how different beliefs about his competence have impacted his ability to communicate and steps that he and members of his support team have taken to change these beliefs.

Presenters
avatar for Pascal Cheng

Pascal Cheng

Education and Communication Specialist, Howard Center
I currently work for the Howard Center in Burlington, Vermont as an educational and communication specialist, providing training and consultation in the areas of augmentative/alternative communication, assistive technology and literacy for children and adults with developmental disabilities... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Work Based Learning Experiences of Students with Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will discuss the findings from a research study that examined the participation of secondary and post-secondary students in work-based learning experiences (WBLE) in four states. WBLE are an innovative solution to preparing students with disabilities for integrated competitive employment. The results presented will address (a) the characteristics (i.e. gender, race, grade, level of intellectual disability) of students who participated in WBLE, (b) the types of WBLE in which students participated, (c) the average amount of time (hours per week, weeks) students spent in WBLE, (d) the extent to which student characteristics relate to the type of WBLE in which they participated, and (e) the extent to which student characteristics relate to the amount of time students spent in each type of WBLE.

Presenters
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois
avatar for Magen Anne Rooney

Magen Anne Rooney

Pre-Doctoral Student, University of Illinois- Urbana Champaign
Hi! My name is Magen and I am a 3rd year doctoral student at U of I- Urbana Champaign. My research focus is on the employment of people with significant disabilities. I am interested in looking at the use of interagency collaboration and supported employment in supporting students... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Sunstone - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Florida TASH Chapter Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Meet and greet fellow Floridians! Learn about what’s happening in our state and how you can become more involved in our chapter.

Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Hospitality Suite - Room 1624 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

Special Education Advocacy – Post Endrew F.
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will explore caselaw, writings and opinions from parents’ and school districts’ perspectives that followed this momentous U.S. Supreme Court decision. The presenters will discuss strategies that parents and advocates can bring with them into IEP Team meeting; mediation and due process hearing processes. They will solicit audience participation and welcome the sharing of different strategies that they may have employed in those processes and the perceptions of those in the audience who have observed directly the behavior and perception of school districts regarding the Endrew F.

Presenters
avatar for Cassandra Willis

Cassandra Willis

Doctoral Student, Virginia Commonwealth University


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:45am

The Revolutionary Promise of Self-Determination: Won't Happen - But What If It Does?
Limited Capacity seats available

Jean Bowen opens this four-part self-determination track by sharing highlights from her famous and confounding Fax that launched the journey of self-determination.

Self-determination - is it dead or alive after initial funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 1993?  A brief history along with recognition of three self-advocates who are the true heroes of the movement will be presented.

Affirmation of Community (UNH) - And Simple Truths - Ric Crowley
  • MDS and Stories from New Hampshire - Doreen Rosimos, Ric Crowley
  • Michigan Process and Stories - Jim Dehem (Invited), Beth Durkee (Invited
  • Maine Process and Stories - Debbie Gilmer

Presenters
avatar for Ric Crowley

Ric Crowley

President, MACROW Associates
RIC CROWLEY has been an advocate for self-determination for people who have disabilities and their families for over forty years.  In a variety of educational, administrative and advocacy positions in Oregon, Ohio, Massachusetts, Washington D.C., Louisiana and New Hampshire, Ric... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Accessible Science: UDL, NGSS, and Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

Science, self-determination, and critical thinking are a vital part of our everyday experiences. Yet, for students with disabilities, science is often not prioritized, limited to nutrition, health and safety, or is just considered "too difficult" for students to learn (Courtade, Spooner & Browder, 2007). This session will provide participants with 1) a focus on understanding the NGSS and the instructional practices that support implementing those standards, 2) understanding Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles and how to implement them in the inclusive classroom, and 3) making lessons accessible for all students, especially those with extensive support needs. We focus on building general and special educators' abilities to collaborate to improve their content knowledge and understanding of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and to develop UDL content, materials, and instruction because we want to help improve opportunities for all students to learn STEM education.

Presenters
avatar for Deborah Taub

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Addressing Issues Important to the Lives of People with Disabilities Using the World Cafe
Limited Capacity seats available

Social, economic, and physical barriers facing people with disabilities are multi-faceted issues that persist despite top-down programmatic and legislative initiatives. More collaborative approaches are needed at the level of individual communities to bring together the voices of citizens who are the most impacted, most passionate, and best positioned to make change. This session outlines one community-engagement approach, the World Cafe, that can be used to increase community awareness, promote systems change, and improve outcomes for people with disabilities and their families. We present the findings of a systematic review of 28 studies reporting on 139 World Cafe events involving more than 4,600 community members. The events focused on eight disability categories, and spanned a wide range of topics including integrated employment, approaches to service delivery, school- and community-based supports, community inclusion, and disability awareness. Findings offer insight for researchers and practitioners using the World Cafe model into the myriad issues World Cafe events have addressed, versatility of the model, and social validity of the model. Further, we outline quality indicators to improve the rigor and reporting of future studies.

Presenters
avatar for Jennifer L. Bumble

Jennifer L. Bumble

Doctoral Student, Vanderbilt University
Jennifer Bumble, M.Ed. is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked as a special educator in Texas and an ESL educator in South Korea. Jennifer also worked as an educational consultant with the Vanderbilt... Read More →
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Sunstone - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Alternatives to Guardianship: Georgia's Supported Decision-Making Project
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2018, the Georgia Advocacy Office funded by the DD Council began a project to bring Supported Decision-Making to Georgia. Building on a long history of Citizen Advocacy and community building efforts, the project brought together Citizen Advocates, Probate Judges, lawyers, families, the State Guardianship Office, self-advocates, and the community to create an alternative system to Guardianship. This presentation will feature the successes and lessons learned along the way. The project replicated and built on the successful Supported Decision-Making project in Massachusetts.

Presenters
avatar for Mark Friedman

Mark Friedman

Associate Professor, City University of New York (CUNY)
1. People with disabilities serving on boards of directors and policy making bodies. | 2. Online teaching. | 3. Disability Studies
avatar for Michael Kendrick

Michael Kendrick

Director, Kendrick Consulting International
avatar for Ruby Moore

Ruby Moore

Executive Director, Georgia Advocacy Office
Ruby Moore is the Executive Director of the Georgia Advocacy Office, the designated Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities in Georgia. Moore is nationally known for her work in the disability field over the past 35 years, particularly in the areas of employment... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Growth Through Opportunity (GTO) Cadets Program
Limited Capacity seats available

The highly unique, national award winning GTO Cadets training program is mutually beneficial for individuals with disabilities and first responders. The one-of-a-kind, dual purpose GTO Cadets program enhances vocational and independent living skills for individuals with I/DD while simultaneously increasing disabilities awareness training for local first responders. The outcome for uniformed GTO Cadets with I/DD is empowerment and community based employment. The outcome for first responders is empowerment and enhanced professional development producing positive outcomes during future real world encounters. A true win-win!
Learn how to implement the highly successful GTO Cadets program in your community, which is now endorsed by the National Sheriffs' Association!

Presenters
avatar for Travis Akins

Travis Akins

Founder & CEO, Growth Through Opportunity
Travis Akins is the Founder & Creator of the mutually beneficial Growth Through Opportunity (GTO) Cadets training program for individuals with I/DD and first responders alike. GTO is officially endorsed by the National Sheriffs’ Association and proudly awarded the 2017 Champion... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Salmon - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

How to Talk About Sex: Questions of Adults with IDD About Sexuality
Limited Capacity seats available

For adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), sexuality and romantic relationships are an often-overlooked topic. Service providers, parents, and other caregivers of adults with IDD frequently dismiss or discourage their family members/program participants from seeking or engaging in sexual relationships (Evans, McGuire, Healy & Carley, 2009; Rushbrooke, Murray & Townsend, 2014). Because of this there has been more focus in recent literature on what parents, caregivers, and service providers think should be done regarding sexuality for adults with IDD. This often includes avoidance of discussing the topic altogether (Cheng & Udry, 2003; Sinclair, Unruh, Lindstrom & Scanlon, 2015). There has also been information regarding what already has been done, or what sexuality and relationships topics are taught to adults with IDD (Frawley & Bigby, 2014; Kim, 2016; Ward, Atkinson, Smith, & Windsor, 2013). What is lacking is a deeper understanding of what adults with IDD think about their sexuality, and what they feel are the topics and questions they need answered (Brennart, 2011). This presentation will provide data from a systematic examination of questions regarding sexual health and relationships put forth by adults with IDD. During a particular 14-week Sexual Health and Relationship Education (SHARE) program, participants were asked each week to anonymously submit notecards that contained questions they had about sexuality and intimate relationships. The questions on the notecards were answered the following week. For this project, notecards from seven different SHARE groups were collected and analyzed using a qualitative thematic analysis method. Initial analyses were then checked for accuracy with members of the organization including the director, facilitators of the SHARE group, and other adults with IDD who work at the organization. Results from the thematic analysis of the questions will be presented. Areas of future research will be provided, as well as information for current practitioners and service providers.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Portland - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

How to Use Inclusive Post-Secondary Education Programs as a Pathway to Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

Representation of students with intellectual and developmental disabilities in employment and post-secondary education is historically and dramatically low in comparison to students without disabilities. In 2008, access for students with I/DD to a two or four year college was expanded by the passage of the Higher Education Opportunity Act. With increased access to post-secondary education comes a need for innovative employment and transition planning and practices in order to increase the likelihood of interest driven competitive integrated employment post-graduation. This presentation will look at how Virginia Commonwealth University's ACE-IT in College, a post-secondary program that serves a diverse socioeconomic and ethnic group of students with intellectual disabilities, autism, and multiple disabilities, prepares individuals for employment through innovative and inclusive practices. VCU's ACE-IT in College graduates have a 90% competitive integrated employment; which is dramatically above the 17% national average of individuals with intellectual disabilities obtaining employment. We will look at how students were able to achieve their career goals through planned, individualized, and systematic college course work that aligns with career interests, use of accessible technology, employment experiences, internships, evaluations, supports, and training.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Douglas/Fir - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Inclusion in Every Neighborhood: Community Facilitation Differences in Urban, Suburban, and Rural Areas
Limited Capacity seats available

When agencies take a person-centered approach, they must consider the neighborhoods and communities in which a person lives. Whether people with intellectual and developmental disabilities live in the downtown metropolis of Los Angeles, the rural desert of Kern County, or the suburbia in between, support services need to be individualized to each person's specific needs and challenges. Every area has unique assets and untapped resources to assist in achieving social inclusion and self-determination. This presentation looks at the creativity, innovation, and collaboration of individuals, their families, and support staff in Jay Nolan Community Service's (JNCS) Community Facilitator Program in Southern California. Applying the ecological model, we will examine approaches for three different people living in rural, suburban, and urban neighborhoods served through JNCS. Their stories will serve as examples on how to build meaningful relationships, develop community membership, and advocate for individual's needs within the context of the place they live.

Presenters
avatar for Melissa Dellens

Melissa Dellens

Family Support Coordinator, Jay Nolan Community Services
Melissa Dellens has a passion for environments that celebrate every person for their diverse identities. She blends her experience in outdoor recreation, disability advocacy, and community psychology to build bridges between unique communities and do her part to create a world where... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Eugene - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Learning Stories: Strengths-based Assessment that Connects Preschool Teachers and Families
Limited Capacity seats available

Have you ever felt the excitement of sharing a powerful learning moment with families? Learn about the process & challenges of writing Learning Stories that celebrate the strengths of young children. Young children experience success in school for many reasons. Certainly, one critical factor is a seamless connection between school and home (Gallindo&Sheldon, 2012). Children with and without disabilities benefit when their teachers and family build relationships through constant communication, shared goals, and shared learning (DEC Recommended Practices, 2014). One strategy to engage families is Learning Stories (LS). Used as a narrative dialogue between families, teachers, and students, this formative portfolio assessment sheds light on learning strengths and individual progress (Carr,2001; Wager et al.,2015). The challenge for special educators is in moving away from writing objective assessment data about meeting developmental milestones, particularly for IEP development, toward stories that reveal the strengths of the child within child-directed experiences. Learning Stories use storytelling to describe a key learning moment for an individual student, emphasizing how a child approaches the learning process through problem solving, curiosity, creativity, communication, relationships, and independence(Carr,2001). It is often these approaches to learning that are absent from understandings of children with and without disabilities throughout the assessment process, but which is valued by early childhood teachers (Collado,2015). Once the learning moment is captured, an essential next step is sharing the learning with both the student and family. Reading the story with the child as the protagonist empowers the family and child, drawing them into the excitement of play-based learning in preschool. Families are encouraged to tell how they experienced the story and the connection to learning at home. We found this feedback from families led to fine tuning of individual students' instruction, learning environments, and supports. Also, these interactions served as the foundation by which strong partnerships were built with families that honored their child's individual strengths, interests, and culture. In a research study at an inclusive preschool center in the Midwest, it was evident that special education teachers struggled the most with writing jargon-free stories that focused on learning approaches rather than developmental skills and as a result the responses of the families to their learning stories were limited. When Learning Stories are written well, they serve to motivate students, improve students' confidence in learning, communicate effectively with students and families about their learning needs, and authentically represent students' learning potential rather than just weaknesses (Bourke et al,2011). It is apparent that at this center, as the teachers improved in their abilities to write strengths-based stories they have developed greater connections with families and the students with and without disabilities. This presentation will demonstrate how a quest to better align assessment practice with teaching, learning and the inclusion of families at one inclusive early childhood center in a large urban midwest school district led to a shift in portfolio development from the inclusion of standardized, skill-based assessments to sociocultural narrative assessments using LS. The principal and researcher are thrilled to collaboratively share their experiences and guide participants in writing their own stories. The presentation will end with findings from the research study on the impact of LS on the special education teachers and families as we sought to understand how the new portfolio assessment approach shifted the assessment culture at this center. It was incredible to see the transformation in the teachers as they learned how to implement this strengths-based assessment approach. They began to be excited about assessment and found these stories about their students to more accurately represent their own values for what learning is important to celebrate in preschool, namely approaches to learning (e.g., curiosity, problem-solving, cooperation) that set the foundation for future success. It was also fascinating to follow the development of various teachers across specialities (e.g., general and special education) as well as across students with varying abilities ranging from those who were typically developing to those with more significant needs. For such professional development to effectively be shared with other schools and professionals seeking to transform their portfolios, it is critical to share what the professional development (e.g., Teacher Learning Communities, training, and one-on-one feedback) looked like as well as the experiences of the teachers and principal throughout this process. Presenters will include the researcher and professional development consultant as well as principal. We are passionate about the importance of moving away from standardized assessments to ensure all children are viewed as independent and thriving learners so are thrilled for the opportunity to share our experiences with other professionals in the field of early childhood.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Belmont - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Neurodiversity on Campus: Awareness, Acceptance, and Meaningful Support Through Partnership
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will describe one California city college's innovative approach to supporting neurodivergent students through collaborative student-professional partnership. City college students play a central role in helping design and direct the supports they deem helpful and necessary while professionals value their expertise regarding their own lived experience and educational and social needs. The presentation will explore how these partnerships have contributed to building meaningful support for neurodivergent students including individual counseling sessions, social groups, and a student-led Neurodiversity Club. Students have also partnered with professionals to inform trainings for faculty in order to help them better meet student needs. Following a description of the programming, the presenter will seek input and ideas from session attendees on other ways to increase meaningful post-secondary student support through culturally competent student-professional partnership.

Presenters
avatar for Natalie Holdren

Natalie Holdren

UC Santa Barbara
Inclusive Education, Cultural & Linguistic Competence, Evidence-Based Practices, Literacy Instruction


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Meadowlark - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Risk vs Reward: Supporting People to Have Rich Lives in an Unpredictable World
Limited Capacity seats available

KFI has been leading the way in providing services that support inclusion and self-determination since the mid 80's when we started shutting down all our segregated services. Through sharing of personal stories we will provide strategies and inspiration based on real experiences of people living rich and meaningful lives. Multiple scenarios will be reviewed including alternative ways to respond when someone is in "crisis", how to stretch support hours using natural supports when funding isn't enough, and how the dignity of risk can be a guiding principle when supporting people to live inclusive lives.

Presenters
avatar for Lyann Grogan

Lyann Grogan

Hiring & Training Coordinator, KFI
After ten years of working in a segregated Mental Health setting as a Music Therapist at New Hampshire Hospital and serving as a member of the National Music Therapy Association’s Training Committee LyAnn found inspiration. She was inspired by KFI's mission to provide supports... Read More →
avatar for Laurie Kimball

Laurie Kimball

Director, KFI South, KFI
Laurie has made a career of facilitating support for people with disabilities to live real lives and participate in socially valued lifestyles in their communities. Laurie's passions are for positive approaches to challenging behavior, person centered services and building community... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Stories from the Journey: Teacher, Parent, and Student Perspectives of a Districtwide Inclusive Education Transformation
Limited Capacity seats available

A rural Maryland school district has been undergoing a transformation towards inclusive education for the past two years. This session shares the stories on the progress, pitfalls, and stages of that journey from the perspectives of educators, parents, and students. The impact of student-centered planning, structural changes to organizational procedures, and collaborative teaching on the participation and learning of students with disabilities will be shared.

Presenters
avatar for Carol Quirk

Carol Quirk

Executive Director, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

The Sparkle Effect: School-based, Intensive, Immersive, inclusive Physical Activity Programming
Limited Capacity seats available

Over five million students with disabilities attend public schools in the United States; yet, most school sports and activities are not designed to accommodate these students. Not surprisingly then, students with disabilities are often sidelined -- excluded from school sports and the critical social opportunities they offer. Moreover, by perpetuating the segregation of students with disabilities from their peers, schools unjustly deny both groups the essential opportunity to learn and grow together. The Sparkle Effect promotes and supports social inclusion of students with disabilities by empowering students nationwide to include students with disabilities alongside their typically-developing peers in school-based cheerleading and dance programs. The result: students with and without disabilities gain acceptance and confidence, become passionate leaders and help schools and communities to embrace inclusion. See www.TheSparkleEffect.org. To date, The Sparkle Effect has generated, outfitted and trained over 200 school-based inclusive teams in 30 states. Once a Sparkle Effect team is generated at a school, the team practices and performs throughout a school's fall and winter sports seasons. As a result, students enjoy consistent participation in Sparkle Effect programming for up to eight months per year. Most of our teams perform at the majority of home sporting events as well as at pep rallies, homecoming parades, and community charity events. Thus, our participants are provided with an intensive, immersive, and inclusive experience. The idea of belonging - of being an accepted part of a school community should be understood as a basic human right. After all, a school is more than just a place; it inevitably reflects the value system of those who occupy it. A school that only tolerates rather than includes its students with disabilities misses the mark. Tolerance connotes the begrudging acceptance of something unpalatable. By contrast, inclusion demonstrates the belief that when we open our minds and our hearts to all people, everyone benefits. In other words, while diversity addresses the mix, inclusion makes the mix matter. Before The Sparkle Effect was formed in 2009, virtually all cheerleading programs available to students with disabilities operated outside of school systems in private gyms: businesses that developed adult-led, segregated, pay-to-play models. Programs designed only for students with disabilities and carried out in segregated, off-site locations cannot achieve our results. TSE stands alone in generating and tangibly supporting school-based inclusive cheer teams. Our participants become spirited, accepted, and valued members of their school community. Students who were once marginalized become exuberant student-athletes who represent the very best in their schools. In June 2013 the US Department of Education published a "Dear Colleague" letter. The letter outlined a Government Accountability Office report, which found that students with disabilities were not being afforded an equal opportunity to participate in extracurricular athletics in public secondary schools. The letter stated, in part, "When the interests and abilities of some students with disabilities cannot be as fully and effectively met by the school district's existing extracurricular athletic program, the school district should create additional opportunities for those students with disabilities." Beyond encouraging districts to "be flexible as they develop programs that consider the unmet interests of students with disabilities," the letter provided little concrete advice to school districts about how to create such programming The Sparkle Effect, a national non-profit, provides a concrete answer to school districts looking for a way to incorporate school-based, inclusive, extracurricular, physical programming. Our teams are youth-led and youth-driven. All team members contribute to the team in a way that compliments their strengths and abilities, while simultaneously enriching the team as a whole. Participation on a Sparkle Effect team promotes open-mindedness, personal awareness, and relationship building. Our team members learn and grow together, gain acceptance and confidence, become passionate leaders, and help schools and communities embrace inclusion. The positive impact resulting from Sparkle Effect teams has been documented in a case study at St. Ambrose University. The study revealed that the presence of a Sparkle Effect team ultimately shifted overall school culture in that it resulted in an increase in respectful, accepting, and inclusive interactions among the entire student body. Our teams also respond to an annual online survey. Our latest survey results (April 2018) were overwhelmingly positive. Over 90% of responders agreed that, since starting a TSE team: (1) students with and without disabilities on Sparkle Effect teams have formed genuine friendships; (2) students with disabilities have become more confident and outspoken during practices; (3) positive interaction between typically developing students and students with disabilities has increased in the hallway, lunchroom, and classrooms; (4) the student body, in general, more readily embraces as a core value the social inclusion of students with disabilities; (5) interactions between typically developing students and students with disabilities have been more respectful and accepting; and (6) the team is a source of pride for the school and community. So, how does it work? The Sparkle Effect offers four primary services to our teams. First, we provide intensive and personalized mentoring as our teams are forming. Our highly experienced and engaged staff members work with school administrators, coaches, and students to ensure that teams are structured for success and sustainability. Second, The Sparkle Effect provides our teams with new uniforms. Our inclusive teams report that their uniforms prove to be transformative. They send the message to the entire school and community: we are all one team. In addition, the uniforms we provide help students convince wary school administrators that the lack of school-based funding need not be an insurmountable hurdle to starting a Sparkle Effect team. Third, we offer hands-on support through our free on-site training program. Our highly personalized trainings allow our staff to guide, inform, and encourage our teen leaders as their teams are getting started, which, in turn, help to establish best practices and ensure sustainability. The trainings also provide our team members with the confidence, sense of responsibility, and motivation necessary to achieve the highest level of success. Finally, we work to sustain our teams by engaging in consistent follow-up, on-going mentoring, and annual refresher trainings. Inclusive. Intensive. Immersive. School-based. Extracurricular. It can be done.


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Tools for Families: Implementing Endrew F.
Limited Capacity seats available

The Endrew F. Case outlines the strength of an IEP and that goals should provide students opportunities to be successful. According to Autin, Docherty, and Arogatus (2018), parents of students with disabilities need to fully understand that their child is entitled to an IEP that enables them to make academic progress with the opportunity to advance from grade to grade in light of their circumstances. Furthermore, the Supreme Court stated every child with an IEP should have the chance to meet challenging objectives and articulated a shift to higher expectations for children with disabilities. Lastly, the case also stated the input of the child's parents and guardians must be taken into consideration. An interactive presentation will be provided using question and answer techniques. Learners will be encouraged to engage with each other. The presentation will begin with an overview of the Endrew F. Supreme Court Case. Participants will be able to interact with presenters by answering questions about the case through an interactive platform like Socrative or Padlet. After explaining the case, implications for students and IEP teams will be discussed. As a part of the discussion, participants will be surveyed for their input for a parent toolkit. The results of the informal participant survey will then be compared to a survey sent to parents of students with IEPs across the US. Participants will see the results of several drafts of parent toolkits. Input for a parent toolkit will be gathered and suggestions for revisions will be taken. The final product will be shared with the participants to use. This presentation aligns with the theme "Be Creative-Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" because gathering information from participants in the session is an innovative solution to creating or modifying a parent toolkit. Furthermore, the reason for the parent toolkit is so parent and self-advocates will be informed of their rights as a result of Endrew F. After reviewing the parent toolkit, parents will be more inclusive in the meeting because they will understand their rights to provide input and advocate for their child to receive an ambitious free and appropriate education in light of their unique circumstances.

Presenters
avatar for Cassandra Willis

Cassandra Willis

Doctoral Student, Virginia Commonwealth University


Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Using Functional Communication Training to Support Adolescent Inclusion in the High School Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

Functional Communication Training (FCT) is an evidence-based practice with decades of proven results in reducing challenging behaviors in students with Autism. However, there is still a significant research to practice gap in our public schools. This workshop will teach providers, parents, guardians, and teachers fundamental techniques to use FCT with adolescents with Autism. Specifically, we will address ways to minimize time constraints while determining the function of a student's behavior, choosing a reinforcer based on preference, and the use of fading the responses so that student learning will generalize across environments.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

Research and Publications Committee Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Research and Publications Committee Monthly Meeting

Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal... Read More →

Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Hawthorne - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:55am

The Revolutionary Promise of Self-Determination: The Importance of Empirical Data (Really, Data Can Be Fun!)
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will focus on the original Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ) grant research and self-determination outcomes.  Panelists will discuss what advocates can do now to promote real self-determination in peoples' lives.

Panelists: Jim Conroy, Dennis Harkins, Jim Dehem (invited), Mike Head

Moderators
avatar for Ric Crowley

Ric Crowley

President, MACROW Associates
RIC CROWLEY has been an advocate for self-determination for people who have disabilities and their families for over forty years.  In a variety of educational, administrative and advocacy positions in Oregon, Ohio, Massachusetts, Washington D.C., Louisiana and New Hampshire, Ric... Read More →

Thursday November 29, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

12:00pm

Let's Connect Luncheons
Attendees may select from one of eight informal mini-luncheons to attend. Boxed lunches are $15 and must be pre-ordered and paid for during the registration process.

Mini-luncheon topics will include:
1. Communication Access (Salon I - Lower Level) Facilitator: Amy Hanreddy
2. Community Living (Salon G - Lower Level) Facilitator: Jenny Lengyel
3. Employment (Salon E - Lower Level) Facilitator: Alison DeYoung, Cesilee Coulson
4. Families and Siblings (Eugene - Lower Level) Facilitator: Raquel Rosa
5. Diversity and Cultural Competency (Salon H - Lower Level) Facilitator: Natalie Holdren
6. Inclusive Education (Salon F - Lower Level) Facilitator: Deborah Taub, Amy Toson
7. Self-Advocates (Portland - Lower Level) Facilitator: Tia Nelis, David Taylor
8. International Chapter (Medford - Lower Level) Facilitator: Chernet T. Weldeab

Thursday November 29, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Adapted Physical Education: Increasing Recreation and Overall Health and Wellness
Limited Capacity seats available

Including students with severe and multiple disabilities in physical education can at times be a challenge. Come learn about inclusion strategies along with approaches to provide valuable adapted physical education activities, skills, and concepts. Purposeful adaptations and modifications will be covered along with instructional tips and resources to assist participants in providing safe and accessible movement opportunities for students with severe and/or multiple disabilities while building a person centered program. Identifying student's strengths and areas of improvement will be discussed to assist in selecting appropriate goals and objectives to increase the student's health and wellness and to plan for transition into adulthood to include recreational and exercise.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Advancing Employment First Strategies for People with Mental Health Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

For the last twenty-five years, a paramount message spanning the disability community and increasingly society in general is that people with disability labels have historically experienced significant roadblocks to employment, but are ready, willing, and able to work. Most importantly, when matched to jobs based on their interests, preferences, education, and skillsets, people with disabilities are highly productive and parallel with their nondisabled peers. This presentation will focus on why specific practices are effective in successfully supporting people with mental health disabilities to thrive in productive employment; current initiatives through the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) that support Employment First systems change for people with mental health disabilities; dissect the evidence and quality indicators of 21st century workforce development and mental health practices; identify the challenges to that system; and identify ways to further de-stigmatize mental health challenges to better foster coordinated efforts across mental health providers, workforce development resources, and private and public sector employers. Meaningful work early and often throughout the treatment and recovery process is imperative, but to fully embrace and maximize productivity from this largely untapped labor source, mental health services and workforce development resources will need to establish and foster new partnerships to overcome diagnosis stigma, and to create an understanding and respect of the non-linear pathway to health and wellness.

Presenters
avatar for Richard Davis

Richard Davis

Policy Advisor, Office of Disability Employment Policy


Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Salmon - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Analyzing Individualized Education Program Annual Goals for Students with Significant Support Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA, 2004), Individualized Education Program (IEP) annual goals are required to enable students with disabilities to be involved and make progress in the general education curriculum and to address other educational needs. Thus, examining the content and quality of IEP goals for students with significant support needs is an important area of research, particularly following the landmark Supreme Court decision in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District RE-1 (2017). This study reports findings from a content analysis of the annual goals in 88 IEPs for K-12 students with significant support needs. Results reflect a lack of comprehensive academic content goals to promote involvement and progress in the general education curriculum, and limited opportunities for students to develop skills associated with self-determination (e.g., choice-making, planning, and goal setting and attainment). Findings also show a focus within goals on student compliance rather than the development of meaningful, challenging skills and knowledge. Implications for research and practice are provided and strongly link to the 2018 TASH Conference theme of "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life". As evident in the findings of this study, IEPs often fail to include content "outside the box" to enable students with significant support needs to be meaningfully included with their peers. Creative and innovative implications for practice presented in this paper are ideas for enhanced teacher training on IEP goal development, more rigorous review processes within states and districts to ensure IEP goals for all students enable them to make progress in the general education curriculum, and the incorporation of skills associated with self-determination in IEP goals. These creative solutions for practice, along with novel implications for research, pave the way for more robust, inclusive educational planning for students with significant support needs.

Presenters
avatar for Kathryn Burke

Kathryn Burke

Doctoral Student, University of Kansas
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Belmont - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Be Safe: Teaching Youth How to Interact with Police
Limited Capacity seats available

Youth with autism and learning differences are a particularly vulnerable population and are seven times more likely to have an encounter with law enforcement or other first responders. Youth with autism and learning differences are often not prepared for such an encounter and may run, fight, reach to touch the responder or his/her tools/equipment or reach into their own pockets unexpectedly resulting in possible escalation, injury or death. "Be Safe" offers direct, explicit instruction to teach youth how to properly behave when meeting with police and first responders.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

College is Possible: The REACH Program at the College of Charleston
Limited Capacity seats available

The REACH Program at College of Charleston celebrates those individuals who strive for more than is expected. The inclusive program is designed to reach into the entire college community of faculty, staff and students to benefit everyone on campus. By working together, professors begin utilizing new teaching techniques, students looking to work in teaching and psychology (among other fields) refine their skills in relating to people, and traditional students learn more about themselves as they interact with REACH students on a daily basis. The REACH Program promotes four pillars of success—academics, increased social skills, development of independent living skills, and career development. REACH students have access to every aspect of college life: classes with typical students, on-campus living, ability to join clubs, take part in social events and complete internships while attending. College IS possible with the REACH Program. The REACH Program embraces the principles of access and equity to all opportunities in society, and promotes the advancement of academic knowledge, social skills, independent living skills, and career options for individuals with disabilities. The structure of the program most closely aligns with the inclusive individual support model described by Hart, Grigal, Sax, Martinex, and Will (2006). Students have access to all College of Charleston classes and activities, with supports including the following: • Typical College of Charleston courses; • Traditional on-campus housing; • Internships on and off campus for career development; • Life skills, self-advocacy, and study skills training; • recreation and exercise facilities, sporting events, and student clubs; • Support for social, academic, and professional integration. Within the inclusive courses, each student in the REACH Program participates in the full curriculum with typical peers, but will be responsible for learning a portion of that curriculum with assignments and exams modified to meet each student’s individual needs.

Presenters
avatar for Edie Cusack

Edie Cusack

Executive Director, REACH Program College of Charleston
Post-secondary education for students with mild intellectual and developmental disabilities.


Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Meadowlark - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Employees with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Job Retention: A Retrospective Review
Limited Capacity seats available

People with disabilities, families, policymakers, researchers, and state vocational rehabilitation programs share an interest in the long term outcomes of individuals participating in the public state vocational rehabilitation program. Yet, there is limited research in the area of job retention or the service delivery practices used to support individuals with disabilities to achieve long term success in competitive integrated employment (CIE). This paper begins to address this research gap by conducting a retrospective review of 139 records of individual with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that were referred to an employment support organization for CIE between October 1, 2009 and December 31, 2017. In comparison to the high national unemployment rate experienced by individuals with ASD, 104 individuals that were referred for CIE secured employment in 126 different jobs. Findings indicate that most study participants were able to move from moderate and intensive levels of support to minimal level of support by 18 months of employment. It appears that employees with autism benefit from the continual assessment and subsequent support that occurs during the extended service component of ongoing support services for supported and customized employment. Services that were offered during this phase included: ongoing customization of the initial job, lateral job moves and career advancement.

Presenters
avatar for Valerie (Vicki) Brooke

Valerie (Vicki) Brooke

Project Director, RRTC on Employer Practices, Virginia Commonwealth University
Valerie Brooke, M.Ed has been a faculty member at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and working in the field of employment for individuals with disabilities for over thirty five years. Ms. Brooke is the Project Director for the RRTC on Employer Practices, Director of Training... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Douglas/Fir - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Going Beyond Healthcare: A Unique Approach to Transition Planning
Limited Capacity seats available

Employment and community engagement are critical to health, well-being, and maximal independence in adulthood. However, young people with disabilities face significant barriers to reaching these goals. Here, we describe a creative approach to this issue that leverages the ongoing interaction with the healthcare system, which is a common denominator for young people with disabilities and chronic conditions. We have found it to be an advantageous, but underutilized, venue for coordinating vocational and educational services and promoting work readiness. The Department of Disability Services at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center has developed a hospital-based intervention to help patients achieve meaningful competitive employment. The program serves individuals with a variety of conditions that include, but are not limited to, autism, cerebral palsy, intellectual and developmental disabilities, chronic conditions, epidermolysis bullosa, and traumatic brain injuries. Our Vocational/Educational Services program involves a Coordinator who is located onsite so that clinical staff has easy access for consultation and referrals, and patients have the convenience of scheduling meetings during office visits or hospital stays. The Coordinator works with referred patients and their families to create an individualized vocational-educational plan with a focus on achieving the most independent level of employment possible. Vocational/Educational Services sees over 100 patients every year and has a long-standing waitlist. Typical outcomes include referrals to community agencies, employment, college, career exploration, and an improved quality of life. Cincinnati Children's Vocational/Educational Services assists a large number of individuals with significant disabilities and their families to improve their employment outcomes, community engagement, and quality of life. Our holistic emphasis on employment and inclusion for patients is in alignment with the vision of TASH, and our work empowers our patients with disabilities to be fully included in the community and to develop a circle of friends and supports that helps each of them to live the life they desire. This presentation will include video testimonials from patients who have utilized and benefitted from the above services.

Presenters
MM

Marcie Mendelsohn

Voc-Ed Coordinator, Cincinnati Children\'s Hospital Medical Center
I have been at CCHMC for 14 years and specialize in transition planning for individuals 16 years of age and older. This includes educational and vocational options and working with community agencies. I look forward to talking with people about what I do and how to help more individuals... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Sunstone - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Help Me! I'm Non-verbal and Need Emergency Assistance
Limited Capacity seats available

Since more individuals utilizing speech-generating devices are living independently or being left alone for periods of time, it is imperative that they have access to emergency services and get the help they need. After consulting with various 911 Call Centers in Colorado, a series of emergency messages and resources have been developed and shared with individuals who are non-verbal, their family members, caregivers, speech language pathologist, and other clinicians for more inclusive participation in the community. This presentation will share these messages, review the process followed for developing them, and explore creative approaches to implement them in the community. Additional innovative low-tech solutions will also be shared.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Eugene - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

How Access to Communication Has Changed My Life
Limited Capacity seats available

In this presentation, I will show how access to communication enabled me to move from Special Day Classes in middle school to full inclusion in high school to earning a Bachelor's Degree in college and finally to being self employed. After I had shown that I could read, my supportive parents were definitely thinking outside the box when they called an I.E.P. and told the school people the new goal was college graduation. For a non-verbal person with autism this was revolutionary. My inclusive high school education prepared me for college. It took me sixteen years to complete a four-year degree because I type with one finger and I insisted that I do the same amount of work as all the other students. After graduation, I started a micro-enterprise with the help of a consultant. I am still non-verbal, but access to communication and technology allows me to advocate for other non-verbal people and more recently advise them how to succeed in college and/or start their own businesses. I will also show how access to communication has enabled me to make friends and enjoy a full life.


Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Inclusion in the United States: Correlations between Key State Variables
Limited Capacity seats available

The U.S. Department of Education reports that the range for all students with disabilities included for at least 80% of the day in the general education classroom in different states is between 83.6% and 36.9%. Such a range also exists for individual disability groups. While other studies have noted these differences, none have attempted to determine factors associated with them. In the present study, using the 50 states as subjects, extant data sources were used to determine correlations between the percent of three groups of students included for at least 80% of the day in each state, and key state variables representing states' political leanings, educational levels, financial conditions, and formal complaints as allowed under IDEA. Also analyzed was the relationship between states' educational achievements and levels of inclusion. Findings are reported in terms of correlations between the variables and the variance accounted for in inclusion by different variables.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Introducing the Quality Indicators of Inclusive Schools: Access and Equity for ALL Students
Limited Capacity seats available

The Quality Indicators of Inclusive Schools (QI), developed by the Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education (MCIE), are a facilitated self-assessment designed for school and district teams. The tool is based on the MCIE framework for effective and inclusive education. MCIE's Quality Indicators asses a school and district's implementation of practices that support the participation of ALL students in general education classes and settings. A team of stakeholders including administrators, general educators, special educators, and other staff (e.g., guidance counselor, paraprofessionals, etc.) who are familiar with the school's operations participate in rating indicators on a scale of the extent of implementation. Results assist a school and district's leadership team in determining areas of strength and opportunities for growth. The QI reflects research-based best practices across a variety of areas critical to high quality inclusive education. This 60-item survey has been used in districts in both Maryland and Illinois as an initial assessment and progress monitoring tool. The items of the survey enable schools and districts to see how effectively they are including all students, particularly those with the most extensive support needs. Presenters will describe the organization of the content of the assessment tool, method to facilitate rating, and will share results across 10 schools. Participants will have the opportunity to rate portions of the assessment based on their personal experience.

Presenters
avatar for Carol Quirk

Carol Quirk

Executive Director, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education


Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Self-Advocacy Instruction in Postsecondary Education for students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), who transition to postsecondary education, must actively acquire their accommodations. Self-advocacy interventions have been identified as critical skills for students with disabilities in accessing accommodations (Janinga & Costenbader, 2002; Test et al., 2005). This multiple probe across participants study examined the effects of Self-Advocacy (SACR; Rumrill et al., 1999) instruction on the ability to request accommodations for four college students with IDD. Results indicated a functional relation between self-advocacy instruction and the students' ability to request accommodations from their instructors.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Portland - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Stories from One of the First Disabled Children in Public Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

Becky Taylor was 3 years old when the federal law allowing the "mainstreaming" of disabled children into public schools was enacted. Starting with preschool, Becky's entire education was in classes where she was often the first disabled child the teachers and other students had encountered. She and her mother have written a book, "Tell Me the Number before Infinity," telling Becky's story from their two perspectives. They will read from the book and have a discussion.

Presenters
avatar for Becky Taylor

Becky Taylor

I was in the first group of children to be mainstreamed into the public school system in 1975. Talk to me about what that was like. I co-wrote a book about my experiences, and will be exhibiting it at the conference. I am now a disability-rights activist and do free-lance computer... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Hawthorne - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

Strengths and Social Connections of Siblings with and without Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

A growing number of studies have focused on the experiences of adult siblings of brothers and sisters with disabilities (e.g., Meadan, Stoner, & Angell, 2010; Smith & Elder, 2010) as siblings provide a natural, lifelong support for their brother or sister with disabilities. This prior research has focused on the challenges and stressors of being a sibling, the attitudes and expectations these siblings hold, and the support needs of these siblings. However, few studies have focused specifically on the experiences of siblings of transition-age youth and young adults with disabilities (e.g., Begum & Blacher, 2011). And none have focused on how these siblings view their brothers/sisters with disabilities in terms of their strengths and positive traits. Our research examines how siblings rate the strengths of their sibling with disabilities, factors associated with these positive strength ratings, how siblings spend time together, and how siblings perceive the quality of their relationship with their brother or sister with disabilities. To conduct this study we used a web-based survey to gather information from 167 young adult siblings (ages 18-30). Results indicate most respondents view their sibling with a disability as possessing a number of positive strengths with variations based on presence of ASD, ID, presence of challenging behavior, sibling's ability to communicate via speech, and residence in the same home. Most respondents held positive views of their relationship and spent time with their sibling doing a variety of activities with family, additional friends, and just as a pair. We will provide time for group discussion of sibling experiences and continued support needs of siblings. As well, we will offer recommendations for future research along with discussion of the implications of the study findings.

Presenters
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University


Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

RPSD Associate Editors Meeting
Associate Editors will meet to discuss the status of the journal and make plans for the upcoming year.

Moderators
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois

Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Hospitality Suite - Room 1624 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

The Revolutionary Promise of Self-Determination: Individual Journeys - A Self-Advocate and Family Perspective
Limited Capacity seats available

What does self-determination look like from the perspective of self-advocates and families?  Panel members will talk about how making self-determination a reality for themselves has impacted their lives.

Panelists: David Taylor, Sheila Fisher, Teresa Moore 

Moderators
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy... Read More →

Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 1:55pm
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

1:05pm

An Inclusive Life Starts with an Inclusive Education: Views from School Administrators
Limited Capacity seats available

This is a Two Part Presentation.
This presentation aligns with the 2018 theme, “Be Creative- Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life” by sharing the leadership and determination that school systems have demonstrated in order to pave the way for all people to have an inclusive life. The presenters will share their views for how school districts and individual schools in Illinois are implementing inclusive practices to improve outcomes of students and their non-disabled peers. Presenters will describe their change processes, and how their districts and schools are evolving to build relationships and networks to create a unified educational system based upon inclusive values.
Part One of the presentation will address the following:
The work of Theoharis and Causton-Theoharis (2008, 2014) outlines a theory of how to create a vision for inclusive education and the related action steps. Through regional and individual district case examples shared, the alignment to such research will be highlighted: 1) How a regional agency engaged their school districts in a strategic planning process to align to a future of inclusive services, 2) How individual school districts are systemically focusing on raising achievement for all, by building capacity and breaking down barriers to access for students with the complex needs 3) How individual schools are improving their service delivery models to ensure all students' needs are met in inclusive settings, and 4) How school districts are analyzing their disability data, identifying hypotheses for gaps in performance, while proposing solutions to address barriers in the era of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).
Part Two will be a continuation of the content.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 1:05pm - 3:00pm
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

A Picture is Worth 1,000 Words: Amplifying Voices of People with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

My passion for photography began years ago when I started taking pictures my son, Aidan, who has a disability and is non-verbal. I captured his daily life and favorite things so he could share them with peers and teachers at school, giving him a voice to share his interests and all that he is capable of doing. I share my story and the process of working with teachers to create photo books that enable students to communicate, back and forth, between home and school. This has been a positive, uplifting process for all involved and I expand upon how it can be applied to a variety of environments beyond school and for all ages. After sharing my personal story of communication and advocacy through Aidan's photo books, I delve deeper during my presentation into how photographs represent a powerful tool for building relationships, changing perspectives, and depicting the many abilities of people with disabilities. I also share my experiences developing and leading photovoice projects that put cameras in the hands of students and adults with special needs, empowering the participants to utilize their own photography as means of self-expression. To share my background, I am an educator, award-winning photographer, advocate, and a parent of a teenage son who has a disability and is non-verbal. I am a 2006-2007 graduate of the TN Council on Developmental Disabilities Partners in Policymaking Leadership Institute, a board member of The Arc Williamson County and a founding and continuing parent advisory council member of WCSLink, a special education parent organization that collaborates with our local school district. I combine my passions for teaching, photography, and advocacy by working with students with disabilities and adults with early stage Alzheimer's to use photography as a powerful means of self-expression. I completed an intensive PhotoVoice training and apply this framework to projects I design and lead. I have had the pleasure of presenting my story and this topic at a number of conferences including the TN Disability Megaconference, TN Department of Education's Partners In Education (PIE) conference, The Arc TN's Future of Disability conference, and at the TN Council on Developmental Disabilities Partners in Policymaking Leadership Institute reunion conference.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

A Research-to-Practice Collaboration to Improve Postsecondary Outcomes for Young People with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

The transition from secondary school to adulthood is a step that every student must take, but can be more difficult and less successful for students with significant disabilities. Secondary educators and outside agency personnel are in a prime position to prepare students with disabilities to transition to college, employment, and community life well. Unfortunately, the Office for Disability Employment Policy (2018) reports that for youth 16 to 19 years old, the employment rate was 23.7% versus 33.1% for youth without disabilities. This discrepancy increases for youth ages 20 to 24 with 47.4% of youth with disabilities versus 71.2% of their same age peers without disabilities being employed. Compounding the employment gap is the question of whether youth are (1) happy with their employment outcomes and (2) are in a position related to the field of their career aspirations. The college, employment and community goals of youth with disabilities can be accomplished with the commitment of practitioners and professionals to: (a) utilize strategies and supports with the very best evidence of impact; (b) adopt policies, funding mechanisms, and practices in ways that expand inclusive college and career pathways for young people with disabilities (Carter et al., 2016; Hall Butterworth, Winsor, Gilmore, & Metzel, 2007); and (c) invest in strong preparation and professional development opportunities to ensure professionals have both the capacity and commitment to implement the effective practices and policies (Morningstar & Benitez, 2013). Through a systems change project aimed at improving outcomes for youth and young adults with disabilities in Tennessee (including those students with the most extensive support needs) - we have embarked on a compelling partnership between the state's Department of Education, the Department of Human Services, researchers at a local University, and representatives from more than 40 organizations. This initiative combines research, training, professional development (PD), and technical assistance (TA) for practitioners and professionals serving youth with disabilities in transition to adulthood. Further, are assisting educators and agency personnel in delivering Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to youth with disabilities in accordance with the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA, 2014). This presentation focuses on the development and initial implementation of research and professional development to ensure effective agency partnerships, well-trained personnel, and high-quality practices for transition service delivery. We will discuss multiple strategies used to triangulate data collection and next steps. We will share the unfolding of this process, lessons we are learning from the partnership, and information about how we are mixing research with cross-agency personnel preparation to develop a comprehensive and compelling approach to meeting the needs of youth with disabilities entering adulthood. As a part of the TransitionTennesse initiative, will present a comprehensive review of research, policy, and professional literature related to Pre-ETS, a statewide needs assessment of stakeholders, datasets of the educational system, and strategies for multi-agency collaboration. In addition, we will share with attendees our free, online professional development portal addressing training and resources related to best practices in transition.

Presenters
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University


Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Sunstone - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Autism and Skilled Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

Seeking and maintaining skilled employment has proven through research to be a major struggle in the lives of autistic adults, ranging from the hiring process to difficult workplace experiences, including burnout, discrimination, and the complexity of intersectional identities. Neurodiversity is a necessity in this process and must be considered at all levels of employment: interviewing, skill assessments, workplace environment, and communications. This study uses qualitative data from autistic employees, their employers, and some key informants in employment for the purpose of identifying ways to improve skilled employment outcomes. The methodology of gathering data involved in-depth, multimodal interviews which were conducted over the phone, in person, in a video conference, or through text-based messaging according to the preference of each participant. We use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to encourage involvement of autistic community members in finding solutions to this specific employment issue. The main goals of this study include understanding the experiences of autistic employees with self-identified successful experiences in skilled employment, developing an effective intervention plan, and increasing competence in the realm of ASD in employment populations as well as in our own research group. Our study uses firsthand accounts of autistic experiences to find innovative ways in which to make changes to the employment process. As a whole, this presentation aims to highlight the need for neurodiversity training and implementation when hiring for positions in skilled employment.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Douglas/Fir - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Constructing Competence Through the Art of Culinary Expression
Limited Capacity seats available

The art of cooking draws on many abilities that have both physical and social elements. Cooking involves cognitive processing, memory, participation in a variety of forms, and exercises decision-making. Our interactive lessons instill basic cooking skills and food safety while promoting the development of relationships, self-efficacy, and illustrate the power of collective abilities. When there are a variety of ways to participate, students learn that there are many ways to contribute, thus allowing them to feel a sense of belonging. The co-presenters will discuss their class structure and the intentionality behind designing and presenting a variety of ways students are encouraged to participate in a cooking lesson each week. Of utmost importance for the facilitators is the encouragement and development of students uncovering ways they can meaningfully participate and express themselves while learning how to communicate these successes in different contexts. The structure of this class allows for the involvement of peer mentors, family members, and community members in our lessons. Many of our mentors are same-age peers at the university, and in many ways, this class makes it possible for our peer mentors to explore and understand ideas such as presuming competence (Biklin, 2005) and move beyond to work toward constructing competence in all encounters. We allow space for our peer mentors and veteran staff members to work with our students to develop strategies and supports that promote and maintain the dignity of our students and foster strong social inclusion across all campus settings. Through the innovative development of a Cookbook/Look-Book, we offer a variety of methods for increased accessibility. The co-facilitators of the cooking class take into consideration several different ways students access learning and present weekly lessons in multiple formats to include a written recipe page, a step-by-step picture recipe page and access to a captioned video-recorded lesson that students can access from their own home kitchens to recreate their favorite recipes. We encourage students to participate in whatever way is most meaningful to them. The co-facilitators recognize too that levels of participation may change from week to week for each student. The process of creating a meal together is thoughtful and dynamic. This process requires active listening, collective decision-making, and reciprocal interactions and tasks. As the facilitators of this class, we work with the students to tailor each lesson to their needs. We provide space for students to exercise choice and to express their own needs and preferences. We construct meaningful experiences from the step-by-step process of creating a dish that engages the students in their senses of smell, sight, sound, taste, and touch. Engagement with aromas and textures allow students to create meals in which they slice, dice, mince and mix with their own hands as a collective experience. Students can engage in self-expression as they choose from nutritious ingredients and design their individual plates of food. In our seminar, cooking brings a sense of accomplishment, engagement, and creative expression. It focuses on the importance of access to the process of cooking for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. For people with disabilities, the collective creation of a nurturing meal can increase self-efficacy and self-determination. Cooking can facilitate decision-making, self-expression, and can foster community involvement and social skills when in an inclusive setting. References Biklen, D. (2005). Autism and the myth of the person alone. New York: NYU Press.


Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Expert Perspectives on the Inclusion of Students with Extensive Support Needs in SWPBIS
Limited Capacity seats available

Schoolwide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) has been implemented in over 23,000 schools across the country; however, questions remain as to how students with extensive support needs (ESN) participate in this practice. In this study, a survey of experts in SWPBIS was completed to assess the ways they perceive students with ESN participate in different aspects of SWPBIS (e.g., rewards systems). The results of this study will be discussed from the perspective of supporting all students to have access to high-quality, evidence-based and effective positive behavior supports. The results of this study will also be discussed within the context of creative, specific ideas for including students with ESN in all aspects of SWPBIS including ways instruction, materials, and schoolwide structures can be adapted to be accessible for all students, including students with ESN.

Presenters
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Kirsten Lansey

Kirsten Lansey

Doctoral Student, University of Arizona
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education, Illinois State University
Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Illinois State University. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with low incidence disabilities in Atlanta, Georgia before attending the University... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Exploring the Use of Live Animation and Virtual Characters (Avatars) to Teach Social Skills to Individuals with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will present the results of a study evaluating the effectiveness of utilizing live animation and virtual characters (avatars) to teach social skills to students with disabilities. Results from the study will be discussed along with suggestions for practitioners wishing to use live animation or avatars with their students. Research has established that competence in social exchanges is one of the key components of academic success and school engagement (Kindermann, 2007); however, for some individuals with disabilities, deficits in social skills can have detrimental impact in other domains as well (Hsiao, Tseng, Huang, & Gau, 2013). Especially for those diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or intellectual disability (ID). As is evidenced by the literature some individuals with disabilities lack adequate social skills which impacts all aspects of their life. One method showing promise to teach social skills is live animation and virtual learning. Live animation is where students interact with an animated character (avatar) that is being controlled in real time by another person. So imagine that the student is in a room and talking to a avatar (think Nemo) on a TV screen and the character is able to carry on a conversation with the student that is natural and not scripted. The avatar can also deliver instruction such as coaching the student in the appropriate ways to start, maintain and end a conversation or how to read facial expressions ("this is what I look like when I am sad"). Utilizing live animation and avatars has the promise of reaching some students more effectively that a human could and therefore would lead to increased learning opportunities. The students can then generalize what they learned from the avatar to interactions with other humans. Animate Live explored the effectiveness of live animation as an instructional method, whether virtual learning/live animation is cost effective compared to traditional video modeling and face-face teaching methods and if virtual learning/live animation is a socially valid way of delivering instruction. This topic is important to the field because social skills play a crucial role in being able to function independently in today's society and technology has the potential to increase the effectiveness of the interventions we use to teach these skills. Developing more effective ways of teaching social skills has the potential to improve students' lives in multiple domains. The conceptual orientation to the presentation is research-to-practice. The presentation aligns with the conference themes by harnessing technology in a creative and innovative way.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Eugene - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Facilitating Meaningful Transition Through Research Based Quality Indicators
Limited Capacity seats available

Implementation of best practices in transition services is not only mandated by law but is important because it affects the future lives of children with disabilities (IDEA, 2004). Many scholars have revealed practices believed to be effective in the transition process for improving students' post-school outcomes. In the 1980s, studies investigating promising practices in this area established criteria for model transition services. However, not all of these criteria were supported by evidence-based research. The problem with defining best practices in this area is that transition planning means different things to different people. Some may define transition as a process of linking traditional academics, remediation, and employment training to support successful post-school outcomes for students with disabilities, whereas others may view it as restructuring the educational system for all students. Clearly identifying principles of best practice from transition research can, therefore, be hampered by differing definitions of transition. Kohler's meta-analysis (1993) is the most widely accepted piece of research used for the identification of best practices in transition services. The purpose of this study was to determine which transition practices have been identified or supported in the literature as having a positive impact on student outcomes. Kohler (1996) later developed the Taxonomy for Transition Programming, which outlines practices associated with improving post-school outcomes for students with disabilities. The practices identified as being effective included student-focused planning, student development, interagency collaboration, family involvement, and program structure. Subsequent research conducted in the area of transition services continues to support these five categories. For students with the most significant disabilities, there is a lack of empirically-based research about which practices lead to positive post-school outcomes. Those practices intended for students with significant disabilities that are most often cited include the following categories: comprehensive transition and person-centered planning; secondary curricula, which include instruction in functional life skills; adult agency coordination; full family participation; and program structures and policies. These five categories of services parallel those described by Kohler. In response to poor post-school outcomes and the need for program improvement, a rubric of Quality Indicators (QIs) to assess transition services for students with significant support needs within Colorado was developed. The aim of these QIs was to assist in both creating and assessing model transition services for students with significant support needs throughout Colorado. This is an innovative and creative approach to empower school teams to effectively individualize transition services provided to students with significant support needs. Additionally, school programs can use the assessment results to create action plans for service improvement. Providing assistance for program changes based on assessment data and collaborative planning within the school teams is then systematically planned and implemented. Results of the Quality Indicators have the potential to impact not only transition service delivery for students with significant support needs, but policy and decision making in educational settings that provide these services. Knowledge gained can then inform pre-service teacher and educational leadership programs regarding the implementation of transitions services for students with significant support needs.


Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Meadowlark - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Inclusion on the Move: Inclusive Postsecondary Education in the U.S. and Europe
Limited Capacity seats available

In this presentation, we will discuss the University Participant (UP) Program at Western Carolina University, a full-time, full inclusion program for college-age students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). We will also discuss the BLuE Project [Bildung (Education), Lebenskompetenz (Life Competence), und (and) Empowerment], a fully inclusive program for students with IDD at Pädagogische Hochschule Salzburg in Salzburg, Austria that was developed to reflect the values and practices of the UP Program. Presenters will present a case study on how professional and personal collaboration led to the expansion of inclusion from the U.S. to Europe, demonstrating "Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life."


Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Instructional Strategies for Self-Care in Health Care at School
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation addresses curriculum and instruction in self-care during health care at school. Students with significant and multiple disabilities that have specialized health care needs benefit from instruction in self-care to transition to adult life (i.e., adult health care, employment, independent living, and inclusive community participation). Self-care skills have been correlated with improved adult outcomes (Carter, Austin, & Trainor, 2012; Mazzotti, Test, & Mustian, 2014; Prior, McManus, White, & Davidson, 2014). Teaching students how to participate in their health care and advocate for their health care needs at school is also a recommended practice by the American Academy of Pediatricians (2012) and the Council for Exceptional Children, Division of Physical, Health, and Multiple Disabilities (2009). This presentation provides research-based strategies for instruction in self-care in specialized health care procedures and related health self-advocacy skills. As a first step, participants will learn how to identify what skills to teach, including the role of the school nurse and physician(s) in individualized education program (IEP) team planning. As well as, how to develop IEP goals that are coordinated with and reflected in students' individualized health care plans and transition plans. Next, a brief review of the intervention literature on teaching students with disabilities self-care skills in specialized health care procedures and health self-advocacy will be provided (e.g., Bosner & Belfiore, 2001; Tarnowski & Drabman, 1987). The remainder and majority of this presentation will focus on the following instructional strategies: (a) task analysis and chaining; (b) prompting hierarchies, including the use of intrusive prompts to promote safety (i.e., caution and time-limited steps; Heller and Tumlin 2004); and (c) reinforcement. Examples of assistive technology and augmentative and alternative communication will be shown. Additionally, strategies will be provided to promote partial participation in care and health self-advocacy for students with the most significant disabilities. Participants will be encouraged to ask questions, share, and comment during and at the end of the presentation. This presentation aligns with the 2018 theme, "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" because historically individuals with the most significant disabilities have had their health care done to them without their participation (Lehr, 2016). Students with disabilities should be afforded the right to have personal control over their bodies by learning how to take part in their health care advocate for their health needs as an important part of realizing a meaningful and inclusive life. In order to promote ongoing dialogue among diverse community stakeholders, participants will be invited to join a Facebook page "Inclusion for Individuals Who Have Disabilities and Health Care Needs."

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Portland - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Replicating A Quality Customized Employment Approach: Lessons from Pathways to Careers
Limited Capacity seats available

The Pathways to Careers (Pathways) initiative is designed to customize and support competitive, integrated employment options for individuals with disabilities, strategically engage employers to host internships and offer employment; and provide needed resources to achieve full inclusion. Pathways provides individuals with disabilities with the information and choices they need to find success in the community workplace. It exposes participants to a wide range of jobs and work settings through paid internships, providing experiential learning opportunities on their path to meaningful employment. Pathways demonstration sites have been operational since 2012 and during that time a third-party evaluation has been conducted by Mathematica Policy Research (MPR). Findings from the evaluation of the demonstration (qualitative and quantitative), a clear understanding of capacity development requirements for providers, feedback and input from demonstration site staff, state agency leadership, employer partners, families and other stakeholders are being incorporated into plans and resources for expansion of the services to new sites in 2018. Also, recent policy and newly publicized resources such as the WINTAC's Essential Element for Customized Employment and funding structures for Customized Employment are being incorporated as aspects of the planning to support sustainable, quality Customized Employment services. Staff from Marc Gold & Associates and the Pathways team will discuss the findings, the input from stakeholders and the additional technical guidance available with conference participants to explore the requirements and challenges inherent in scaling and sustaining a quality Customized Employment service delivery approach that leads to Competitive, Integrated Employment options for individuals with significant of impact of disability.


Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Salmon - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Research to Practice: Training Pre-Service Educators on Family Partnership Using Simulated IEPs
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will provide a brief overview of the research literature on preparing educators to partner with families of students with disabilities, including the results of a multiple-baseline design study by the presenter, which evaluated an innovative method for training pre-service teachers using simulated IEP meetings. The remainder of the session will provide instruction on a research-to-practice approach (derived from the multiple baseline design study) to incorporating simulation into pre-service and in-service training for professionals who participate in IEPs and other planning meetings with families. The intervention involves providing a training to participants that includes the use of a structured meeting agenda that encourages family partnership. Participants are then provided with IEP meeting scenarios and opportunities to role play with their peers as they navigate through simulated planning meetings. Special emphasis is placed on culturally competent approaches to building family partnerships.

Presenters
avatar for Natalie Holdren

Natalie Holdren

UC Santa Barbara
Inclusive Education, Cultural & Linguistic Competence, Evidence-Based Practices, Literacy Instruction


Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Belmont - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Utilizing Family Talents to Create Inclusive Environments
Limited Capacity seats available

In this breakout session, I will present a project I completed with my extended family to better include my daughter in family activities. My daughter has multiple disabilities and challenges including: global developmental disability, cortical vision impairment (CVI), provisional diagnosis of autism, sleep disturbance, learning to use a choice board to communicate, and uses a walker to move around. The purpose of the project was to get my extended family more involved in my daughter's life by understanding her diagnosis, supporting her to become a self-advocate, while working to create future leaders in special education, law, and disability. Using Fullan's model of creating effective leadership, I developed a plan in which I first interviewed extended family members about their understandings of disability. We then worked together to create adapted books and calendars for my daughter, read and discussed a literary text about children with disabilities, and discussed what least restrictive environment means and what it looks like. Through this collaboration, we created an inclusive family environment allowing my daughter to be included and make decisions about family activities. We also learned more about each other's strengths and talents. Through this presentation I will share how family members each have a unique trait and unique talents which can be utilized to support each other in leadership, how to become a self-advocate and how to advocate for others, and improved quality of life for family members with a disability. I will then share a literature review on the research examining how to better support families when creating an inclusive family dynamic, improve quality of life for all family members, and support family members to become advocates.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

Who's Training Who? Examining Job-Embedded Paraprofessional Training to Support Social Interactions
Limited Capacity seats available

Paraprofessionals are essential to successful inclusion of students with significant disabilities. Special educators are tasked with training and supporting paraprofessionals often without preparation for this part of their job. The purpose of this presentation is to share findings from a study that examined the effectiveness of special educator-delivered training of paraprofessionals in public schools. Effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability will be discussed. Special educators have many roles and responsibilities. Among these are training and ongoing support of the paraprofessionals in their classrooms. To implement effective training and support, special educators need to know what works and how to implement effective adult learning methods. Further, special educators need methods that can be used efficiently within the realities of busy classrooms and many other responsibilities. In this presentation, we highlight two studies that investigated the effects of job-embedded training and ongoing support on the paraprofessionals use of the targeted teaching practices, and the student's learning of their targeted objectives. Implications will be discussed. The presentation will provide a brief review of the current literature on training and supporting paraprofessionals. Among the chief findings from recent research: 1) training of paraprofessionals often takes an informal, on-the-job approach, 2) future special educators receive little preparation in adult learning and/or specific training and support approaches for working with paraprofessionals, 3) special educators report having limited time on the job to supervise and train paraprofessionals, 4) paraprofessionals frequently report job responsibilities that include instructional and curricular planning and decision making, and 5) research studies often rely on a research assistant (rather than the special educator) to train the paraprofessional. In this study special education teachers delivered a job-embedded paraprofessional training curriculum to increase the rates of social facilitation by paraprofessionals working with students with low-incidence disabilities in general education settings. Rates of social facilitation, and subsequent rates of social interactions between students with disabilities and their general education classmates were measured utilizing a concurrent stacked AB design across six participating special education teacher, paraprofessional, and student triads. Study sites included classrooms in three public middle schools, two public elementary schools, and one comprehensive public high school. Special education teachers were able to complete the initial training with their participating paraprofessionals in an average of 66 minutes and in a manner consistent with their existing teaming model. Initial trainings were broken into five components, including 1) a perspective taking activity examining social relationships using a Circle of Friends model, 2) the importance of supporting social interactions and relationships for students with disabilities, 3) the paraprofessional's role in facilitating social interactions, 4) review and breaking down specific social facilitation strategies, and 5) a plan for follow up activities between the paraprofessionals and general education teachers. Results varied by triad, with some paraprofessionals showing strong treatment effects on social facilitation after receiving the training, and some showing limited effects. All students with low-incidence disabilities increased their rates of social interactions with general education peers as a result of the training. Social validity measures and field notes indicate that teachers were pleased with the training package and would be willing to use the curriculum to train paraprofessionals in the future.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

International Chapter Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

This meeting is for anyone interested in international disability issues. Agenda forthcoming.

Presenters
avatar for Michael Kendrick

Michael Kendrick

Director, Kendrick Consulting International
avatar for Donald Taylor

Donald Taylor

Membership & Chapters Manager, TASH
avatar for Chernet T. Weldeab

Chernet T. Weldeab

Adjacent Faculty/Professor, Montgomery College
Currently I am working with a position of Adjunct Faculty/professor, ATPA Coach, at Montgomery College, Maryland. For more than fifteen years, I worked in education settings from secondary school counsellor position to university professor, focusing on teaching and research. In addition... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Hawthorne - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

2:10pm

The Revolutionary Promise of Self-Determination: The Future for Self-Determination as Envisioned by Tom Nerney
Limited Capacity seats available

This interactive session will focus on the writings and reflections from Tom  Nerney including Affirmation of Community and his forthcoming book, Threshold of Freedom.

Presenters
avatar for Mark Friedman

Mark Friedman

Associate Professor, City University of New York (CUNY)
1. People with disabilities serving on boards of directors and policy making bodies. | 2. Online teaching. | 3. Disability Studies


Thursday November 29, 2018 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

An Exploration of Text-based Peer Support in Parent to Parent Networks
Limited Capacity seats available

Parent to Parent support is an evidence-based intervention for parents of children with disabilities or special healthcare needs. Help-seeking parents are matched with a trained supporting parent/parent navigator who has a child very much like theirs. Parent to Parent USA's endorsed practice for a match is that the pair talk over the phone at least four times over the course of two months (Santelli, 2002) . A mixed-methods evaluation of Parent to Parent showed that parents who received at least four calls successfully addressed the problem that prompted them to call, and had the greatest improvement in their acceptance of their child's disability (Singer et al., 1999). Parent to Parent coordinators have expressed that younger parents who contact their program often state a preference for text-based support. They are more comfortable soliciting support on Facebook, Listservs, and by text and email messages (Dodds, 2015). Because these support paradigms have developed since the original evaluation research was conducted in the late 1990s, it is unclear whether text-based support is as effective as telephone support, and what best practices should be endorsed. It is critical to the sustainability of Parent to Parent organizations to begin to explore how text-based support is being utilized within programs so that we may develop research to assess its efficacy and develop evidence-based best practice guidelines for the provision of text-based Parent to Parent support.

Presenters
avatar for Robin Dodds

Robin Dodds

Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Special Education, California State University Los Angeles


Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Botswana International Service Learning Project: Expanding Intercultural Competence and Cross-Cultural Communication Skills
Limited Capacity seats available

As part of a Fulbright-Hays Group Project Abroad grant titled "Botswana: Reciprocal Exchange of Cultural Perspectives, Knowledge, and Skills," 15 graduate students, professionals, and faculty members with specialization in low incidence disabilities embarked on a four-week adventure to Botswana, Africa. A significant goal of the project was to develop participants' intercultural competence and cross-cultural communication skills. Quantitative and qualitative findings from this experience will be shared.

Presenters
avatar for Karena Cooper-Duffy

Karena Cooper-Duffy

Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University


Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Financial Education to Financial Inclusion: Bridging the Gap between for Persons with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

People with disabilities face challenges in making ends meet and planning for the future, including an overreliance on alternative financial services. Given the diversity of the disability community, some persons may rely on public benefits as their main source of income. Financial education is an important strategy for an individual to build financial stability. It provides the knowledge and skills individuals need to manage their money and enhance their economic status. Without financial education and skills, these individuals may be prevented from achieving financial inclusion potentially jeopardizing their financial well-being. To address this challenge, National Disability Institute and Wells Fargo Foundation collaborated to integrate financial education into select public workforce centers and other community service partners that provide employment services to people with and without disabilities. This integration was achieved by providing training and technical assistance to job center and other community service partner staff to bring financial literacy education activities (Hands on Banking) to benefit youth and adults across the spectrum of disabilities as well as job seekers without disabilities. In addition to the training, financial tools, resources, and supplemental instructor guides were created to address employment and financial resources that can help to eliminate barriers to financial well-being and self-sufficiency. Steps toward integrating financial education programs into existing programs can be as simple as providing a link to financial education tools to a client. A more formal initiative would include the completion of online courses by creating a financial education program within and existing program. This session will provide the attendee with a variety of strategies on how to effectively incorporate financial education programs within their service delivery model. The session will also highlight new tools, including the Disability Supplemental toolkit and reference guides to enhance the delivery of financial education for persons with disabilities and other barriers to employment.

Presenters
avatar for Elizabeth Jennings

Elizabeth Jennings

Deputy Director, National Disability Institute
Excited to share field-tested strategies for improving the financial well-being of people with disabilities.


Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Douglas/Fir - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Guided Group Discovery: Developing Blueprints for Employment Youth and Adults
Limited Capacity seats available

Guided Group Discovery (GGD) opens doors to employment for people who experience barriers to finding jobs, especially the right job. Discovery is the foundation of Customized Employment. It is a proven evidence-based practice that improves employment outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities. Too often, traditional vocational assessments are based on comparative and/or normed approaches that often determine that people with significant disabilities may not be a good match for most jobs. Guided Group Discovery is an alternative assessment tool proven to identify the strengths of job seekers with disabilities, but particularly those with multiple barriers to employment. The purpose of GGD is to lay the foundation for Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) that meets the job seeker's preferred characteristics and conditions of employment and the needs of a business. The GGD process produces an individualized Blueprint for Employment that can be used by job seekers to set up informational interviews, develop natural supports in the community, strengthen their networking pitch, and obtain successful employment in their community. Come hear the LEAD Center and National Disability Institute talk about and share tools and resources created as an alternative process for discovering one's interests, contributions, and conditions for employment. Upon completion of the Guided Group Discovery process, the job seeker and/or their representative can use this information to meet with specific employers in an effort to negotiate a customized job description or design a self-employment opportunity.


Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salmon - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Including All Citizens Project: Transforming Post-Secondary Inclusive Teaching
Limited Capacity seats available

The Including All Citizens Project (IACP) is a pedagogical model that involves the full inclusion of students with ID into Faculty of Arts (FA) courses for credit and on equal basis with other students. This model opens the doors of education by making already existing university courses environments where all students can participate and succeed. Without adapting the academic foundation and content, IACP uses the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to transform teaching and deliver curriculum to a wide range of learners. It is a student-centered learning environment where everyone is included and valued on equal basis thereby making it an exemplary learning experience for all. Students in the IACP will receive their FA Certificate (FAC), an exit credential consisting of 30 academic credits (10 courses). The FAC pre-exists the IACP and is designed to provide an educational experience that prepares students for work, citizenship, and to engage critically with their communities.

Presenters
avatar for Fiona Whittington-Walsh

Fiona Whittington-Walsh

Faculty, Kwantlen Polytechnic University: Inclusive Post-Secondary Pedagogy
Dr. Fiona Whittington-Walsh is Chair of the Department of Sociology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Langley British Columbia Canada. She is also the President of Inclusion BC, a non-profit organization that advocates for the full inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

LifePrep@Naz: A Mentor Program to Promote an Inclusive College Campus
Limited Capacity seats available

LifePrep@Naz (LP) is an innovative college based, post-secondary transition program for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) at Nazareth College in Rochester, NY. A primary strategy in meeting the needs of the students in the LifePrep@Naz program is the use of peer mentors. The purpose of peer mentors in many programs may be to support the learning and inclusion of students with IDD on campus, however LifePrep recognizes the learning and growth for the peer mentors can be just as important to overall program outcomes. Our program provides experiences for over 50 mentors each semester, builds over successive years, and provides opportunities for both learning and reflection. In LifePrep@Naz, the mentor program is working to create a community that understands the value and worth of all individuals. The mentor program works to integrate LP students into the campus community, providing mentors with training and experience to be leaders in inclusive practice, and creates a richer more diverse campus benefiting the entire campus community. As the result of our program, we have observed growth in the inclusive spirit at Nazareth, leading to more engagement and partnerships across campus. Peer mentors have been the driving force behind several changes leading to this increased inclusion. In this presentation, we will share the components of the LifePrep@Naz peer mentor program and the data we have collected over the last several years examining the changes measured in attitudes, awareness, and skills. Through the lens of our program, we will identify best practices in establishing and maintaining peer mentor programs.

Presenters
avatar for Cynthia Kerber Gowan

Cynthia Kerber Gowan

Faculty Liaison, LifePrep@Naz, Nazareth College


Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Meadowlark - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Peer Supports to Enhance Active and Meaningful Engagement in Inclusive Elementary Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

Despite the fact that students with disabilities are increasingly receiving services in inclusive educational settings, students with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including those with autism, multiple disabilities, and deaf-blindness, are most often educated in segregated settings away from their peers who are typically developing. According to the most recent national data, less than one third of students with significant disabilities spend 80% or more time of their school day in general education environments. When these students are included into general education settings, there has been an over-reliance on one-to-one paraprofessional support that has been cited as creating barriers to active participation and interactions with peers and belonging with peer groups. Participation, membership and belonging leads to relationships, which ultimately are one of the keys to quality of life. Children and youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities, like all children and youth, benefit from healthy social relationships and friendships. Moreover, there continues to be a significant need to improve the effectiveness and quality of inclusive education programs for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities that promote active engagement with academics and positive peer networks and supports. One resource that has been underutilized in facilitating inclusion of students with disabilities is actually the other students. This presentation will explore the use of evidence-based strategies to implement peer supports and networks to enhance the active and meaningful participation and learning of all students in inclusive, culturally and linguistically diverse educational settings. The discussion will include how special and general educators can collaborate and be innovative to develop appropriate, natural peer network and support strategies. In particular, focus will be on elementary-age students and classrooms since the majority of current literature on peer networks and supports to promote inclusion has often focused on the secondary level (middle and high school). Possible barriers to implementation of peer supports will be discussed and viable, creative solutions to overcome these barriers will be brainstormed. Finally, participants will have the opportunity to develop plans to return to his/her school to implement strategies shared in this session.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Positive Behavior Support in Inclusive Settings: A Four-Step Checklist for Addressing Self-Injury
Limited Capacity seats available

Special education teachers often report that behavior-based professional development trainings providing practical and implementation-ready strategies are infrequently offered by their school districts. This presentation attempts to address this issue by outlining the implementation of a four-step checklist for addressing self-injurious behaviors within an inclusive classroom setting. Strategies presented as part of this presentation include (1) identifying the function of problem behaviors; (2) implementing proactive, function-based behavioral interventions, as well as teaching and reinforcing socially acceptable replacement behaviors; (3) maintaining student safety; (4) and monitoring student progress and implementation fidelity through data collection and analysis. Each step of the checklist is described in detail with practical-based examples. Among students diagnosed with ASD, between 33% and 71% engage in self-injurious behaviors (SIB) at one time or another (Richards, Oliver, Nelson, & Moss, 2012). Unfortunately, students who engage in serious problem behaviors such as SIB are more likely than their peers to be excluded from inclusive education settings (Sappok et al., 2014). In accordance with the 2018 TASH Conference theme (Be Creative-Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life), the purpose of this presentation is to provide educators with a "behavior support checklist" that (a) supports educators with meeting the behavioral needs of students within inclusive settings; and (b) enhances student communication skills to facilitate meaningful social interaction with peers, both in the school setting and beyond.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Self Evaluation as a Tool for Developing and Sustaining Inclusive Practices
Limited Capacity seats available

Despite a well-established research base, high quality inclusive school practices remain tenuous in many schools and districts. By engaging in self-evaluation of inclusive practices, school teams are able to critically evaluate systems at their school site in relation to evidence-based practices, and make informed decisions regarding new systems, priorities, and training. Presenters will share how they have worked with stakeholder teams at multiple school sites, elementary through high school, to tailor and implement self-evaluation tools, facilitate discussion and analysis of data, and establish achievable goals with educator and administrator buy-in. Focus schools include sites who are relatively new to inclusive practices and schools with well-established inclusive approaches. Several free self-evaluation tools (available online) will be shared, as well as the process used by school teams to leverage this stakeholder input to make meaningful and sustainable changes to improve both access and outcomes for all students.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

The Forgotten Outcome: Leisure and Recreation as a Vital Transition Domain
Limited Capacity seats available

The four major components of transition are clear; employment, daily living, academics, and community participation. However, one aspect of the community participation is often left out and/or overlooked; leisure/recreation. In this presentation, we will discuss the ways in which we emphasize recreation to promote stronger quality of life outcomes.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

The Role of a Good Support Person
Limited Capacity seats available

All too often, well-meaning paid caregivers and family members of people with disabilities overstep their roles as supporters, such as making decisions or speaking on their behalf. These are barriers for self-advocacy and being in control of one's life. This will be a guided, interactive session where real-life examples and role-playing will help people with disabilities ensure they have the best person-centered supports.

Presenters
avatar for Tia Nelis

Tia Nelis

Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of... Read More →
avatar for Raquel Rosa

Raquel Rosa

Special Projects Manager, TASH
Raquel is the eldest sibling of a young man who has cerebral palsy. Her career as an advocate for disability justice began 16 years ago, providing direct supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In 2010, she co-founded a Washington, DC-based social/support... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Portland - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Use of Portable Smart Devices In Teaching Functional Skills To Students with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this manuscript was to systematically review the literature on the use of portable smart devices in teaching students with intellectual disability functional skills. Eighteen empirical studies were identified and summarized. This review especially focused on which devices were included and how these devices were used to teach home-, school-, community-, and job-related skills to this population. Percentage of non-overlapping data (PND) was calculated to quantify the effects of using portable smart devices.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Eugene - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Using Community Engaged Research to Center Student Voice and Guide Program Development
Limited Capacity seats available

As research opportunities through postsecondary education programs expand across the country, it essential to keep student voice at the center of research activities and program evaluation. Community engaged research (CER) is one method for engaging students as co-researchers, and ensuring that programs develop in line with student desires. This session will provide an example of how the CTP program at UNCG uses CER to elicit student feedback and then incorporates that feedback into development. Different accessible research methods that are used in concert with CER will also be highlighted.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Belmont - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Using Vocational Card Sorts with Secondary Students with Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will focus on the use of vocational card sorts with secondary students with intellectual disability. Directed at secondary special educators and transition specialists, this presentation will support participants' understanding of the purpose, use, and benefits of vocational card sorts. Throughout the presentation, participants will learn the steps of implementing vocational cards sorts. Attendees will walk away with an accessible tool for assessing a variety of vocational elements and understand how this can influence a student's career decision-making.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Sunstone - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Community Living Committee Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

The Community Living committee will be focusing on affordable housing, the direct support crisis, and best practices in support services.  Please join us if these are topics of interest to you!

Presenters
avatar for Jenny Lengyel

Jenny Lengyel

Executive Director, Total Living Concept
I am a fun, passionate and friendly person. I believe in and fight for Social Justice and the rights of all human beings. I love to read and listen to country music.


Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Hospitality Suite - Room 1624 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Early Career Research Network Meeting and Social Hour
Limited Capacity seats available

Early career researcher network business meeting and social hour.

Moderators
Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Hawthorne - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

School Choice – Implications of Vouchers and Charter Schools for Students with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Given the recent popularity and attention given to school choice, the National Council on Disability (NCD) – an independent federal agency that advises the President and Congress – undertook a study of how students with disabilities fare in such arrangements. Come learn the major findings and recommendations to policymakers regarding the experiences and outcomes of students with disabilities whose families make use of voucher programs and/or enroll them in charter schools in lieu of traditional public schools.


Thursday November 29, 2018 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

"Who Says It" Often Matters More Than "What Is Said"
Limited Capacity seats available

Educators have the potential of being important and powerful allies in resisting ableist habits in schools and the community. To become politicized in this way, it is vital that teacher preparation programs introduce their students to the lived experience and voices of the leading advocates and scholars with disabilities. The presenters will discuss how they innovatively incorporate the voices of those that matter into their curriculum and professional learning in order to provide access to powerful counter-narratives of disability.

Learning Goals:
  1. be aware of culturally proficient Essential Elements and Practices for incorporating voice and lived experiences into professional learning and research endeavors
  2. learn how to apply culturally proficient Essential Elements and Practices for incorporating voice and lived experience of those that matter and into professional learning and research endeavors
  3. become familiar with high quality resources for incorporating the voices of those who matter into curriculum and professional learning

Presenters
avatar for Rebecca Brooks

Rebecca Brooks

Assistant Profressor, California State University San Marco
Dr. Rebecca Brooks is an Assistant Professor in the Special Education teacher preparation and graduate program in the School of Education at California State University San Marcos. She has worked with individuals with disabilities in educational, recreational, vocational, and residential... Read More →
avatar for Norman Kunc

Norman Kunc

Although Norman Kunc and Emma Van der Klift are well known speakers and advocates within the disability rights community, they prefer to think of themselves as modern day storytellers, continuing the long held tradition of using humour and narrative to initiate self-reflection and... Read More →
avatar for Jodi Robledo

Jodi Robledo

Associate Professor, California State University San Marcos
avatar for Jacqueline Thousand

Jacqueline Thousand

Professor Emerita, California State University San Marcos
Dr. Jacqueline Thousand, a Professor Emerita in the School of Education at California State University San Marcos, is an internationally known disability rights advocate and educator.  She has authored 26 books and numerous articles on inclusive education, organizational change... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Current Digital Literacy Curriculum Practices with Students with an Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

Digital literacy refers to the use of technology with accuracy and fidelity. Students with an intellectual disability may have deficits in digital literacy from lack of instruction. Digital literacy skills allow individuals to socialize via social media, use the internet, and apply to universities and for employment; thus increasing inclusion in the digital society in which we live. We will share results of a statewide survey emphasizing teacher knowledge of digital literacy, current digital literacy practices, and make recommendations for future practice.

Presenters
AF

Andrea Forsyth

Doctoral Student, University of Nevada, Reno


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Eugene - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Dealing with Autism, Depression and Trauman in One's Middle Ages
Limited Capacity seats available

Dealing with Trauma in the middle ages (30+). After Transition post-high school, and experiencing a mid-life crisis. Experience the true story how a person with autism faces trauma and depression in their mid-life and some techniques to deal with it from a first hand perspective.

Presenters
avatar for Stephen Hinkle

Stephen Hinkle

Self Advocate, Self Employed
Stephen is a self advocate, person with autism and a current online facilitator for Lesley University. Stephen is a graduate of Northern Arizona University with a masters degree in special education disability policy. Stephen obtained his undergraduate degree from San Diego State... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Help Wanted: 20.1% of People with Disabilities Make up the Labor Force-Transitioning Internships into Job Opportunities
Limited Capacity seats available

The Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University, which runs InclusiveU, recognized that their graduating students needed better preparation for employment once they left the campus. In 2015, the Project SEARCH model was adapted for use with post-secondary students on campus. The non-traditional use of this model has allowed students to gain access to the skills necessary to find competitive employment in their community. Blending the model with an academic major has created a unique capstone experience for our students in their final year. Using their course of study, students are matched with internships that enhance their working skill set by mindful planning of the structure and implementation of responsibilities at each site. This attentive planning has assisted students in transitioning from the role of "student" to the role of "employee". Additionally students are also travel trained during internships, to facilitate independence following graduation from the university. The program makes use of a variety of iPad apps such as Timestation, Find My Friends, Habitica, and many others to help students stay organized and to improve self-monitoring while working independently. Program staff have been innovative and flexible to accommodate the needs of both the students and the internship sites on campus. Working alongside University and community business partners, internships have evolved in to job opportunities both on and off campus. In this session participants will learn how this non-traditional model is used, how to create internships to address individual student needs, and how to create a network of community business partners.

Presenters
avatar for Brianna Shults

Brianna Shults

Internship and Employment Coordinator, Syracuse University - Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education
Internship and Employment Coordinator for InclusiveU’s Project SEARCH program. She holds a B.S. in Biology and a MSed, along with a teaching certificate, from Le Moyne College. She is currently pursuing a Masters in Public Administration. She comes to Syracuse University from a... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Salmon - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Innovation in Teacher Preparation: Outcomes of a Federally Funded Personnel Preparation Grant
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation highlights innovations and outcomes from an Office of Special Education Programs funded Teacher preparation grant as related to teachers' experiences in implementing evidence-based practices over the past four years. Specifically, the presenters share their experiences of coordinating with teachers who were new to working with students with significant learning needs and teaching them to apply evidence-based practices in their classrooms with the goal to increase inclusion for students with significant disabilities. The presenters will findings from the past four cohorts and share strategies to assess and target evidence-based inclusive practices.

Presenters
JB

Joshua Baker

Professor/Researcher, University of Nevada Las Vegas


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Literacy Learning Opportunities for Students with Extensive Support Needs in Postsecondary Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

The opportunity to learn and practice literacy skills in natural settings is critically important for children and adults. Because literacy skills form the foundation for learning other skills in a variety of educational, social, and employment-based contexts, there is a need to explore literacy learning opportunities for young adults. In this presentation, we will share the findings of a systematic literature review that explored literacy assessments and interventions for students with extensive support needs (ESN) in postsecondary programs. We will also share preliminary findings of a mixed-methods study that investigated the perspectives and experiences of postsecondary program personnel and ways students with ESN access literacy in postsecondary settings. The findings of the literature review and mixed-methods study will be discussed from the perspective of identifying innovative ways for young adults with ESN to access literacy learning opportunities within the natural setting of a community college or university campus.

Presenters
SC

Susan Copeland

Professor, University of New Mexico


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Sunstone - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Living on Campus: Approaches to Supporting Students in Inclusive Campus Housing
Limited Capacity seats available

In the field of inclusive higher education, "being creative" is a necessity. In a time in which higher education funding is decreasing at the state and federal level, institutions must be creative in order to provide programs that meet the needs of every individual, including those with disabilities. The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 has led to considerable growth in higher education programs supporting students with intellectual disability. The availability of federal financial aid and a model demonstration program (Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities, or TPSID) have led to the development of innovative opportunities for individuals with intellectual disability to be included in higher education. Data from Think College, the National Coordinating Center for the TPSID program, show that more than 3,000 students have accessed higher education through the TPSID model demonstration program and there are 270 inclusive higher education programs serving students with intellectual disability in the U.S. as of May 2018. One such program, The University of Missouri - “St. Louis" Succeed program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities, needed to "Be Creative" in order to establish a fully inclusive residence hall for their students to live, learn, and grow into independent adults. As inclusive higher education programs across the U.S. continue to add residence hall living to their postsecondary programs, they must find creative and innovative ways in ensure that supports allow for students to lead a meaningful and inclusive life on campus. This presentation will provide a national overview of inclusive higher education in the U.S., explore the range of approaches to and supports provided for campus housing, and highlight UMSL's process of developing inclusive campus housing. The session will be useful to students and families looking to understand the range of approaches to campus living and the necessary supports to ensure inclusivity, and will provide practical strategies and tips for practitioners in inclusive higher education seeking to offer inclusive campus housing.

Presenters
avatar for Clare Papay

Clare Papay

Senior Research Associate, Think College, UMass Boston


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Meadowlark - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Painting an Inclusive World
Limited Capacity seats available

Artists First will present an interactive workshop on how creative self-expression provides opportunity, equity and full community inclusion for individuals with disabilities. This recreation and leisure workshop addresses communication, community inclusion, diversity and cultural competency, employment and self-advocacy.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Providing Access to Employee Handbooks: Using EBPs to Build Text Comprehension
Limited Capacity seats available

Employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual disability (ID) continue to be among the lowest reported (Migliore, Butterworth, & Hart, 2009; Siperstein, Parker, & Drascher, 2013). Literacy skills are critical for obtaining employment and for supporting continued success in the workplace (Concei, 2016), but individuals with ID typically have very low literacy levels (Katims, 2000). Limited research has been conducted on literacy skill development for young adults with ID, particularly on work-related texts such as employee handbooks. Research supports the use of shared stories on adapted age-appropriate texts for students with significant cognitive disabilities, including those with ID (Hudson & Test, 2011; Shurr & Taber-Doughty, 2012; Spooner, Kemp-Inman, Ahlgrim-Delzell, Wood, & Davis, 2015), but these studies primarily focused on elementary or middle school students. Very little research on shared stories has been conducted with older students with ID (ages 18 and up). These students may have access to functional academic instruction, such as accessing real-world texts, within high school, vocational programs, and postsecondary education programs found in colleges and universities. Participation in university-based postsecondary education programs for young adults with ID have demonstrated improved competitive employment outcomes for this population, with 82% of the students working jobs that paid at or above minimum wage (Grigal & Hart, 2013). Functional academic instruction, such as literacy skill development, within these programs has successfully included the incorporation of technology to access or supplement the intervention (Evmenova, Behrmann, Mastropieri, Baker, & Graff, 2011; McMahon, Cihak, Wright, & Bell, 2016). The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a multimedia shared story using speech-to-text technology on the text comprehension skills of workplace texts of college students with ID. This study used a multiple probe across participants design to measure the effectiveness of the shared story intervention across three sections of the employee handbook. This research seeks to extend the literature by investigating the effects of this literacy treatment package on the participants’ comprehension of the text and their ability to transfer that knowledge into a practical demonstration of related work tasks. Results will be discussed as well as limitations and future research implications.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Douglas/Fir - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Reduce Stress! Feel More Connected and Calm!
Limited Capacity seats available

Discussion, demonstration and participant practice of evidence-based strategies which help to increase sense of well being, reduce stress, and manage strong emotions. These will include mindfulness, progressive muscle relaxation and mediation. The format will be brief lecture, participant discussion in large group and with partners, and the opportunity to practice the techniques. Discussion will include how to individualize these strategies so that they can be useful for everyone, in any environment.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

The State of Inclusion for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities: A Synthesized Review
Limited Capacity seats available

Inclusive education rates for students with significant cognitive disabilities continues to be abysmal, even though we have decades of research illustrating positive outcomes for inclusion. By examining current research and deconstructing larger policy and practice issues, it is possible to develop innovative plans to help the field move forward. This session will bring together several strands of research and inquiry into solutions to systemic barriers for inclusive practices at the federal, state and school levels. This session will look at the current state of inclusive practices, consider the implications for federal policy and state and local practice, and then consider how to use processes from other fields, such as implementation science, to move forward. We will illustrate research related to patterns of inclusive (and segregated) contexts, school and postschool outcomes and opportunities for students who have been included in general education contexts as well as those who have not. We will examine the “Gold Standard” of research and will problematize what it means to have evidence-based practices (EBP), especially for students with IDD. This portion will identify areas of concern for identifying EBP for this population (i.e., the small “n” size of this population, the lack of research within inclusive contexts, and the reliance our field has on the single case design study). These factors combined with funding agencies typical preference for large populations and randomized controlled trials, effectively limit the level of research we are able to do and support we are able to systematically provide to educators working with this population. Next, we will report initial findings and recommendations from a national cohort of experts who explored and identified best practices for students with IDD and future research and policy needs at the student, classroom and school, state and federal levels.

Presenters
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Professor, Portland State University
avatar for Deborah Taub

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Yes! You Can Teach Emotional Regulation Skills and Improve Behavior AND Academics
Limited Capacity seats available

Schools are faced with a growing population of students who have difficulty managing their behaviors. Many of these students are diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder or other specific disability such as ADHD or Nonverbal Learning Disorder. Historically, these students have been a challenge to educators as their behaviors often overshadow their otherwise strong cognitive skills. Behavioral interventions have frequently proven ineffective as they don't show progress across settings or appear to last. However, new compelling research showing deficits in the areas of the brain that control and regulate emotions is poised to shake up education world and lead the way for new and more targeted interventions. Let's get creative and try something new to support student behaviors in the classroom!!! It is critical to reframe the way education views behavioral issues in children. Currently, the focus is on the child's behavior as the critical element for analysis or change. Our work focuses on the child's underlying emotions that are driving their behavior. This shift is grounded in the new research on the emotional centers of the brain. Using this research to drive the discussion, we will highlight how by teaching children to identify, understand and then manage their emotions, their behaviors will change. Further, we will discuss the importance of teaching children in the classroom rather than teaching them skills in an office or group and asking them to generalize the skills later. We will show that by using both whole class lessons, and specific targeted interventions, student behavior can be dramatically improved. Teaching a child to understand and manage their own emotions is powerful! Emotions aren't negative but the behavior that comes from unmanaged emotions can be. Let's put the tools for learning in the hands of our students and show them that change is possible and achievable.

Presenters
avatar for Lori Jackson, M.S.

Lori Jackson, M.S.

The Connections Model
Lori is an educational psychologist who has been working with students and their families for over 15 years. She believes that all children have the capacity to succeed in school and the right to a quality education. Lori has seen the transformation that is possible when students... Read More →
SP

Steven Peck

The Connections Model
Steve is a special educator with over 15 years of experience working with students who have multiple and severe disabilities. Steve believes that new technology is key to helping students overcome their functional skill deficits in the classroom. Steve has always been both a teacher... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Belmont - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

TASH Self-Advocacy Forum
Limited Capacity seats available

Empower Us is an international self-advocacy team. It works with Inclusion International to grow self-advocacy around the world. At this session, you will learn about the five big issues that  self-advocates from around the world are working on. You will have a chance to network with other self-advocates and supporters about what you think are the most important issues for TASH to work on. We hope by sharing these issues with you that you will take them back to your TASH Chapter and/or Self-Advocacy Group.

Presenters
avatar for Tia Nelis

Tia Nelis

Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

4:25pm

Cal-TASH Chapter Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Meet your fellow California members! This laid back meeting is open to all interested in what's happening in California.

Moderators
Thursday November 29, 2018 4:25pm - 5:15pm
Portland - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:29pm

About Poster Presentations
Poster Presentations capture information about a particular topic in the form of printed text and graphics. Poster presentations are displayed on large foam core boards on easels.  Poster presentations are shared during a 1.5-hour period in a large room with other poster presentations.

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:29pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

North Carolina TASH Chapter Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

This will be our 4th meeting of the year. We will discuss NC policy.

Moderators
avatar for Karena Cooper-Duffy

Karena Cooper-Duffy

Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Eugene - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Networking Reception
Join TASH's Networking Reception to connect with friends and colleagues, enjoy light snacks, and check out over 40 outstanding poster presentations, too!

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E/F - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

A Collaborative Approach to Successful Early Childhood Inclusion: Access, Participation and Support
This interactive presentation will highlight the multi-agency collaboration and family partnerships necessary to support successful inclusion in early childhood programs. The importance of effective early intervention for young children and their families is well documented. Early childhood staff need to be supported by strong leadership, quality and meaningful professional development and access to ongoing opportunities to collaborate and problem solve with specialists. It is also critical that families are involved in all aspects of the child's program to build positive relationships with the staff as well as to support and nurture their young children at home. Planning tools and visual strategies will be shared to demonstrate how to individualize supports for full participation. Participants will hear from family members about the benefits of these partnerships to support them in the home and how this journey had prepared them for future school experiences.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

A Systematic Literature Review on Self-determination of Children with Disabilities in South Korea and the United States
This study is designed to promote awareness and active development of curriculum in the area of self-determination for students with disabilities through literature review of self-determination in South Korea and the United States. To achieve the purpose of the study, the researchers examined research articles pertaining to self-determination published from 2000 - 2018 in both countries, and then analyzed the trend of the studies and curriculum of self-determination. This literature review on 16 journals in South Korea and Eric, EBSCO, Academic Search Complete, Education Source, Google Scholar, PsycINFO , and Teacher Reference Center in the United States was performed.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Addressing Challenging Behavior in Health Care at School
This presentation connects to the theme "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" because strategies discussed promote the dignity, physical, and emotional well-being of students in inclusive school communities (e.g., peer disclosure and school personnel training to facilitate natural supports).

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Adults with IDD Empower their Financial Wellbeing: A Transformative Mixed methods proposal
Adults with IDD face significant obstacles in their daily lives that affect their economic well-being, such as limited employment and lack of autonomy over their finances. This transformative mixed method explanatory sequential proposal aims to explain and understand the financial well-being of adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD). Proposed methods include a quantitative phase followed by a qualitative phase, a researcher administered survey N = 66 to participants with IDD at two disability service centers followed by two focus groups with 16 co-researchers with IDD using PhotoVoice as a participatory action research methodology. The proposal seeks to give a voice to and empower adults with IDD by co-researching what financial well-being means then by disseminating the results to community stakeholders and policymakers. Participatory action research makes space for participants/co-researchers voices providing innovative solutions for inclusive life (i.e., inclusion in the financial marketplace) experiences.

Presenters
AD

Allison D'Aguilar

Graduate Student, VCU
I am a trainer for the Leadership and Empowerment for Abuse Prevention project. | LEAP provides training to people with disabilities, by people with disabilities on healthy relationships and abuse prevention.


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

An Innovative Solution to Spelling for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) must have access to their general education curriculum. Various methods, such as the iPad, can be the innovative solution to increase communicative language for children with ASD. By learning to spell on the iPad, children with ASD can request for items using generative language. The purposes of this study will be: (1) to teach children with ASD how to spell words on the iPad with the Proloquo2go application using a visual prompt and (2) to determine the effectiveness of this intervention in increasing functional requesting.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

An Innovative Solution: Integrating Service-Learning into an Introduction to Exceptionalities Course
This session addresses the topic of inclusion with particular focus on how pre-service teachers view inclusion through service learning. The experiential learning provides opportunities for candidates to deepen their perspectives and maximize their understanding of inclusion for all learners through hand-on experiences and reflection. Pre-service teachers conduct open dialogue interviews with teachers in the field, paraprofessionals, administrators, and families to determine how the school community addresses inclusion. Other experiential activities include attending IEP/Section 504 meetings, engaging in community advocacy experiences, and participating in other professional development opportunities.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Ask Yourself: A Preliminary Study of a Self-Questioning Strategy
Previous research indicates that the Ask Yourself strategy has a positive academic and social impact on high school students with significant disabilities. The current study replicates this earlier work with one elementary aged student. A multiple baseline across behaviors design was used to determine the effectiveness of teaching the Ask Yourself strategy to one second grade student with a significant disability. An individualized set of materials and adaptation of the Ask Yourself strategy was developed in collaboration between myself and the student's special education teacher. While limitations in study design prevent the current study from demonstrating a functional relationship between use of the Ask Yourself strategy and the participant answering comprehension questions, the participant's improvement was recognized by his teacher and parents which has promising implications for future research.

Presenters
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Be Creative: Use Technology to Empower All Students
This session addresses the topic of technology with particular focus on how pre-service teachers can promote access to the general education curriculum for all students. Pre-service candidates gain a better understanding of inclusion by the use of universal design principles. The candidates also develop ways of using the internet to expand the horizons of all students by creating a list of the most useful apps that could be used to modify, accommodate, or differentiate instruction in the classroom.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Changing Attitudes: What Medical Students Can Learn From Self Advocates with ID
As a part of a multi-year curricular intervention, first year medical students enrolled in the Genetics course took part in a lesson designed to improve their understanding of the needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). A young man with Down syndrome and his mother presented to the group. Following with presentation, students were asked to respond to a brief writing prompt. The themes that emerged after analyzing and coding the data were Person Centered Care, the Role of the Family, and Inclusion.


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Classes and Activities Where High School Students with Severe Disabilities are Included
This poster presentation will focus on findings from a recent study that examined the types of classes and activities high school students with severe disabilities are engaged in throughout the school day with peers without disabilities. This presentation aligns with the theme, "Be Creative- Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" by building an understanding of the types of opportunities that are currently available for students to engage in with peers. Findings will serve as the basis for discussion about how to expand opportunities for students with severe disabilities to interact and participate in classes and activities with their peers.

Presenters
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Come to Life: Prioritizing What Really Matters
Youth with autism and other learning differences are currently having dire outcomes with respect to LIFE (Love & relationships, Independent living, Further education & Employment) because the vital process of self-discovery ("Know yourself, love yourself, be yourself") is being left out of IEPs and other transition plans. This presentation will feature stories and personal experiences of a young man with autism that became a CPA but left his full-time permanent accounting job with benefits behind in order to help his peers and their allies (parents, teachers, therapists, etc.).

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Connected or Isolated? A Pilot Study Examining the Social Networks of Special Education and General Education Teachers
Using a social capital theoretical framework, we examine the ego networks (information and advice giving/seeking networks) of 71 middle and high school general and special teachers across 3 schools to understand the presence/absence of ties and factors related to access to social resources within school organizations.

Presenters
LL

Lingyu Li

Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Katie McCabe

Katie McCabe

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Creating an Inclusive Writing Workshop in Your Classroom or School
Since its founding in 1946, Meeting Street has been on the vanguard of educational best practice for students with special needs and a strong advocate for the proliferation of inclusive education. At Meeting Street, inclusive education utilizes a flexible, dynamic approach in which students with and without special needs learn side-by-side, every day to achieve their individual, developmentally appropriate, academic, social and therapeutic goals. To this end, Meeting Street wishes to share its inclusive Writer's Workshop model, which has been implemented with strong results at The Grace School, our nationally recognized, fully inclusive K-8 independent school located in Providence, Rhode Island. The Writer's Workshop presentation will provide teachers with a guide to leveraging the key elements of the workshop format, including whole-class, small-group and individualized instruction. Topics will include supporting independence for students with special needs and Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC) as a writer's tool. The presentation will offer faculty insights on planning, implementation and considerations for teachers interested in implementing an inclusive writer's workshop at their own school, or within their own classroom.


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Cultural and Linguistic Competency
In an ever changing time, the world is becoming a more diverse and pluralistic place. It stands to reason that the clients/coworkers with whom you work also reflect the changing dynamics. To address some of these issues, this session will look at concepts of cultural and linguistic competency and how they may help your agency better manage and operate in these shifting times.

Presenters
avatar for Vard McGuire

Vard McGuire

Fair Housing Coordinator, Disability Law Center


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Does Parental Knowledge about the Transition Process: Agency Usage and Transition Outcomes?
Studies indicate that neither transition meetings nor other parent outreach methods used by schools are preparing parents of students with special needs for the roles they face during transition years and after graduation. Although the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act emphasizes the importance of parental participation in the transition process, parents report that they are not knowledgeable about the transition process or options for post school services. Due to the complex needs of individuals with disabilities and intricate post-school agency systems, parental understanding about the transition process and agency systems is particularly important for parents of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Unfortunately, parental knowledge of the transition process and its effect on agency usage and transition outcomes is not well documented. Therefore, the goal of this study was to understand how parental knowledge of the transition process and human service agencies is related to agency usage and transition outcomes. This study used the Taxonomy for Transition Programming as a guide to develop a questionnaire for parents of children with an intellectual disability who had graduated from a Texas high school. The survey examined parent's views about transition experiences, agency experiences, transition outcomes, and opinions about the transition process. It was hypothesized that family knowledge about transition and human service agencies that was developed within the transition process would be positively related to agency usage, transition outcomes, and parental opinions about the transition process. In addition, it was hypothesized that agency usage would be positively related to transition outcomes. The results of regression analyses failed to find either statistically significant relationships or noteworthy effect sizes for any component of the transition process with agency usage or transition outcomes. In addition, agency usage did not predict transition outcomes. On the other hand, statistically significant results and noteworthy effect sizes were found for the relationship between the family knowledge of the transition process and parental opinions about the transition process. Future research is needed that builds on the findings of this study in order to establish the effect of parental knowledge on agency usage and transition outcomes. Transition is directly related to an inclusive life and I have suggestions for innovative solutions to more directly involve parents in the transition process.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Examining Factors Related to Student Attendance and Participation during IEP Meetings
Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) are an important component of special education. During an annual IEP meeting, a team outlines academic and/or functional goals for the student with disabilities, as well as supports and services designed to help the student achieve these goals. Using a national, web-based survey, this study examined student attendance and participation during IEP meetings. Participants included 1,183 parents and/or legal guardians of school-aged students with disabilities. Results indicated that only one-third of students attended their IEP meeting, with students in older grades more likely to attend. Most students who did attend their meeting were not actively participating. Although historically student participation has been conceptualized as consisting of both administrative-type student IEP behaviors and students providing input and preferences about IEP content, a factor analysis revealed only a single, unified factor. Correlates of student attendance and participation included the strength of the parent's partnership with their child's teacher, as well as student characteristics such as grade level, time in the general education setting, anticipated high school diploma, and functional ability level. This presentation aligns with the TASH Conference's "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" theme. Specifically, this study aimed to examine the IEP meeting, a common phenomenon for students with disabilities and their families, in a new, "outside of the box" way. While other studies have examined student participation during IEP meetings, they have only considered participation as a yes/no variable. In contrast, this study examined how students were participating. By understanding what is happening during IEP meetings, we can find ways to meaningfully include students with severe disabilities during these critical planning meetings. All students, regardless of age or disability, should have the opportunity to provide input regarding plans that will specifically impact them. Promoting self-advocacy during the school years will prepare adults who are able to effectively advocate for their wants and needs.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Examining the Relationship Between Organizational Factors and Employee Attitudes Toward Inclusion
This study will examine the relationships between employee characteristics, organizational characteristics, organizational climate and employee attitudes toward inclusion. It is hypothesized that organizations that provide smaller, community-based services and that rely less on government funding will contribute to more positive staff attitudes. It is further hypothesized that certain organizational climate factors (Open Systems and Human Relations) will have a direct and indirect relationship on employee attitudes.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Families and Educational Policies: Examining the Letter and Intent of the Law
Families are extremely influential contributors to long-term student outcomes, including employment, community living, and quality of life (DD Act, 2000) and the benefits of positive family-professional relationships are numerous, including improved student academic, behavioral, and social growth, regardless of external and internal factors (Henderson & Mapp, 2002). Despite the important role of families and the recognition of families by policymakers, numerous barriers to positive family-professional relationships exist. An additional, often overlooked, barrier is the valorization of the roles of families in federal policies. Given the legacy of devalued social roles and profound influence of terminology on shaping perceptions of caregivers, terminology used in federal education legislation is especially important. In this presentation, we will (a) identify terminology used to describe caregivers and caregiver-professional interactions in federal general and special education laws (the letter of the laws), (b) use Wolfensberger's model of social role valorization as a lens to explore how this terminology influences the interpretation the law (intent of the laws), and (c) make innovative recommendations for terminology to better capture the letter and intent of the

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Family Perspectives on Engaging with Adult Support Agencies
This poster presentation will detail the preliminary results of a mixed-method study addressing family perspectives on engaging with adult support agencies. Directed at secondary special educators and transition specialists, this poster presentation aims to increase practitioners' understanding of: (a) the role families play in securing community supports for adult family members with disabilities, and (b) family members' thoughts, perceptions, and feelings towards engaging with adult support agencies. This increased understanding can inform practitioners' efforts to connect families with adult support agencies and improve post-school outcomes.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

General Educators in Inclusive Interventions for Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disorders
Responding to policy, practice focused on supporting students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in general education classrooms requires a strong understanding of research-supported interventions. This systematic review took an innovative and creative look at inclusive classrooms by examining interventions evaluated in general education classrooms for secondary students with IDD and describing the involvement of the general educators in those interventions. Forty studies evaluated interventions involving 177 students with IDD and approximately 108 general educators. Available intervention approaches fell within five categories: self-management interventions, peer support interventions, peer-mediated social interventions, systematic instruction interventions, and educational placement interventions. Moreover, general educators were reported to have involvement in six areas: consultation/planning, peer arrangements, implementation, social validity, data collection, and general instruction. Most interventions aimed toward social outcomes, with less attention focused on academic attainments. Findings highlight the need for continued research (a) in secondary general education classrooms, (b) addressing the active involvement of general educators, (b) examining the effectiveness of inclusive interventions, and (c) using of rigorous methodology. Limitations and implications for research and practice are discussed.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Inclusive Education in Rural Schools
Inclusion in rural schools can have mixed outcomes for students with significant disabilities. They may be in the general education classroom because the school size may limit separate special education classrooms. In other rural schools there may be challenges in providing inclusive education in the school and in community settings. In this study, teachers in rural schools were interviewed about the issues that they face in providing inclusive education to these students.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Intellectual Disability: Recent National Data
Think College, the National Coordinating Center for the US Department of Education-funded Transition and Postsecondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disability (TPSID) programs will share findings from its recent evaluation of 46 TPSID programs located at US colleges and universities in 2016-17 as well as trend data over 7 years related to inclusive course access, career development, campus membership, credential attainment and employment outcomes at these programs. The Higher Education Opportunities Act of 2008 created grants for TPSID model demonstration projects, implemented between 2010 and 2015 at 57 colleges and universities and currently being implemented from 2015 to 2020 at 46 campuses in the U.S. The data presented in this session are from a large-scale survey study of the practices and effectiveness of inclusive higher education implemented by the 25 TPSID grantees in 2016-17. The evaluation protocol implemented by the TPSID NCC was reviewed and approved by the federal Office of Management and Budget. This web-based data collection effort reflects a uniform dataset for collection of program and student variables from the TPSID demonstration projects and their partner sites across the country. These data detail student demographics, enrollment, academic, social and employment engagement, as well as reflect programmatic infrastructure. The evaluation protocol was developed in alignment with the Think College Standards for Inclusive Higher Education (Grigal, Hart, & Weir, 2011). This dataset is currently the largest and most comprehensive source of information on inclusive higher education for students with ID. This session will be a poster presentation with two presenters. The poster will display a brief explanation of the TPSID model demonstration project and the role of the TPSID NCC in evaluating the TPSID projects will be provided, as well as a graphical and visual presentation of the primary findings from recent data. Specific data to be presented include inclusive course access, career development, campus membership, credential attainment and employment outcomes at these programs. In addition to the visual poster, the presentation will include two accompanying accessible handouts that further describe the findings from 2016-2017 data related to the students who are attending college and the practices of the colleges/universities involved. The movement toward postsecondary education (PSE) for students with intellectual disability (ID) is breaking ground in inclusive practices through innovative approaches. Higher education programs supporting students with ID are using creativity, innovation, and determination to pave the way for meaningful and inclusive lives for people with disabilities. Through this poster, we aim to raise awareness of existing higher education opportunities and the benefits to students with ID that are gained through participation in these programs to allow for persons with ID, families, practitioners, and others to gain knowledge that will allow them to advocate for greater access to these innovative inclusive opportunities.

Presenters
avatar for Clare Papay

Clare Papay

Senior Research Associate, Think College, UMass Boston


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Inclusive STEM practices in Special Education: Experimental Studies in Robotics for Students with ASD
Technology-aided instruction is an evidence-based practice to teach academics to students with ASD (Wong et al., 2014), but research investigating the effects of teaching coding of robots to promote learning STEM skills is very limited. The current set of studies examines how model-lead-test or video modeling can be used to instruct students with autism and intellectual disabilities to acquire coding skills to manipulate the movements of commercially available robots.


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Integrated Service Delivery Focus: Special Education and Adapted Physical Education
For students with significant disabilities, it is vital for professionals to develop innovative and collaborative solutions to meet the needs for an inclusive and appropriate educational experience. At times, each professional works in their own expertise silo, providing their services to the student without collaborating with other service providers in order to maximize inclusive opportunities with general education peers. In this presentation, faculty from an Institute of Higher Education (IHE) will share their integrated approach to training special educators and adapted physical educators to collaborate effectively to increase the quality of the K -22 years old student's educational experience and movement opportunities within and outside the classroom.

Presenters
avatar for Dr. Joanne Van Boxtel

Dr. Joanne Van Boxtel

Assistant Professor, Cal Poly Pomona
Passionate about inclusion, teaching and learning, and international disability issues.


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Korean American Parents' Perceptions of Transition Experiences for Their Children with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities
In order to understand better how Korean American students with disabilities go through transition and how education and services can become more effectively targeted for them, this study is designed to examine postschool outcomes of Korean American young adults with disabilities and the experiences of their parents related to the transition from school into adulthood through collecting qualitative data. Overall, the two themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: postschool outcomes of Korean American young adults with IDD and experiences of moving into adulthood. The postschool outcomes are composed of three subthemes, including higher education, employment, and living, while the transition into adulthood includes use of an ethnic informal organization, parents' readiness for future, professionals' unresponsiveness on parents and students' preferences, and language barriers. The findings discuss implications for practice among educators in order to enhance the involvement of Korean American parents in the development of long range plans that will affect the postschool outcomes of their children with disabilities.

Presenters
avatar for Kyeong-Hwa Kim

Kyeong-Hwa Kim

Professor, Konkuk University
Hello~


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Making Free Time More of a Choice - A Study of Social Networks for Post-High Students
Choice in recreation is taken for granted by most Americans. In this interview study the authors identified what post-high students and their teachers from two Midwestern programs reported with respect to the students' recreational opportunities as well as what changes they would make to ensure better access in the future. The findings from this study can suggest ideas on how we might as a community "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life." The voices of these post-high students will we hope help others in our community to "think outside the box" and "pave the way for meaningful and inclusive lives for people with disabilities" who live in our communities with respect to accessing existing community social/recreational opportunities. Summary. Most transition frameworks emphasize social competence, participation, and relationships (Hughes & Carter, 2012; NASET, 2005); yet, family members and educators have reported that people in the community who have developmental disabilities more often than not stay home (Kleinert, Miracle, & Shephard-Jones, 2007). It is not clear whether staying home simply reflected personal preference or whether it represented a lack of access due to limited social networks, transportation barriers, financial barriers, or other barriers. While choice among existing recreation and leisure opportunities in the community is taken for granted by many Americans, it seems not to be the case for those with identified intellectual and developmental disabilities (c.f., Kunstler, Thompson, & Croke, 2013). Both the interview process as well as findings from this study will be useful in particular to high-school and post-high practitioners as will as community agency staff who work with young people who have identified developmental disabilities. Content will be relevant to post-high students, parents and family members, and teachers of students enrolled in post-high programs. Student participants were members of diverse groups (African-/European-/Latinx-American, male, female, upper class, middle and lower class). The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine what students with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their post-high teachers had to say about access to community and leisure activities in their community and whether and which barriers if any remained a concern. Interviews were conducted with 10 post-high students identified as having intellectual or developmental disabilities and enrolled in school-district sponsored post-high programs. We also interviewed 5 instructors associated with the post-high programs. Participants were from two Midwestern communities - one suburban and one urban. Student and instructor participants were asked about: (a) their own or their students' preferred recreational/discretionary time activities, (b) what if anything may have prevented students from engaging in these activities, (c) a brief description of their own or their students' social networks, and (d) what changes they recommended so that any identified barriers might be eliminated in the near future. Instructor participants were also asked which social support interventions were used to facilitate friendships and peer relationships. Individual interviews were conducted in a quiet office at the post-high instructional setting. Interviewers followed the same open-ended interview protocol with each participant. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. The data were subjected to a thematic analysis using a constant comparative approach (Lincoln & Guba, 1985; Strauss & Corbin, 1998). Member checks occurred at two junctures --- the end of the interview and during follow-up meetings with each participant. Preliminary Findings. Two of 10 post-high student participants currently accessed community or recreational activities independent of family-initiated activities. Students did "hang-out" with classmates outside of school. Reported activities included watching Netflix, listening to music, and playing with pets. For a majority of participants, families provided transportation; two participants from the urban group relied on city bus transportation. Eight students reported having Facebook accounts, 4 reported frequent (at least weekly) use of Facebook/cell phones to connect with friends and six reported infrequent (less than once/month) or no use of the same. For a majority of this group, friend connections were made during school hours or facilitated by parents/family members. Students would like to use more social media, volunteer in the community, attend sports events, spend more time in the company of friends“ at their homes or the movies, and attend more classes at the university or community college. Reported barriers included lack of transportation, lack of knowledge about available programs, and unhelpful/unprepared recreation providers. Instructors reported that students were interested in learning new forms of social media and had varied interests including sports, TV, and music. They noted students did not access community activities other than those facilitated by their families, and that sports and volunteering through faith-based organizations were likely to be of interest to students. A common barrier identified by instructors was lack of easy access to transportation. Instructors noted that their program placed significant emphasis on jobs and social skills related to jobs and less emphasis on facilitating friendships and connecting with the community for recreation. Plans are in place to work with representatives from community agencies to address identified barriers.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Mindfulness on the Autism Spectrum
Mindfulness has revolutionized interventions in fields such as psychology and it has greatly improved outcomes for some individuals with mental health diagnoses. But how can mindfulness interventions benefit people with autism and complex support needs? This presentation will explore how mindfulness may be a useful tool to individuals with ASD by reviewing the literature on mindfulness and autism. This presentation aligns with this year's conference theme, BE CREATIVE- INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS FOR AN INCLUSIVE LIFE, in the mindfulness is the result of the marriage of science an ancient practices. Today mindfulness interventions have the potential of enabling people with autism t self-manage challenging behavior and the live a more inclusive life.


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Nutrition Education in Schools for Children with Significant Disabilities: Implications for Inclusion
This systematic review sought to identify all nutrition, eating behavior, and food preparation educational interventions within school settings for students with significant disabilities (intellectual, intellectual/developmental, and multiple). Furthermore, eligible studies were evaluated as to whether they met the standards for What Works Clearinghouse quality of research design and implementation. This study answers several questions about health education for children with disabilities. Are they being taught this information? How are they included in health education? How is curriculum delivered so as to be accessible? And is the quality of research informing best practices of high quality?

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Overcoming Opportunity Barriers in Inclusive Educational Environments: A Synthesis of the Research
Current research states that students with extensive support (ESN) and complex communication (CCN) needs may experience opportunity barriers in their educational setting (Pufpaff, 2008). Special and general education teachers must now ensure that students with ESN and CCNs are fully engaged in their educational environment (Browder et al., 2007). Educators may not have the experience or expertise to effectively accommodate or modify grade-level curriculum for these students (Browder et al., 2007). The purpose of this review is to identify opportunity barriers and investigate how they are perceived and impact students with ESN and CCN in their educational setting. A secondary aim is to identify identifying evidence-based practices (EBP) that would increase opportunities to learn (OTL) in inclusive educational environments (Taub, McCord, and Ryndak, 2017).

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Person Centered Assistive Technology and Inclusion: Beliefs, Considerations, and Futures
Conversations with families, special education teachers, and teacher candidates regarding the use of assistive technology in the promotion of education in inclusive settings for students with severe/profound and multiple disabilities. Along with observations of individual student usage of assistive technology, current practice of identifying and implementing assistive technology is described and ways to incorporate person centered planning information in the assessment process is recommended to increase participation in inclusive environments.

Presenters
avatar for Craig Miner

Craig Miner

Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Preparing High School Students with Disabilities for College
Preparing high school students with disabilities for college who seek both non-degree certificates and 2 year degree certificates can be difficult. Campus Connect is a dual enrollment post secondary program for the Madison Metropolitan School District and Madison College. This session will inform attendees about post secondary readiness skills in instructional methods, self-determination, self-advocacy, and accommodations vs modifications in the IEP, so students with disabilities are college ready before they graduate high school. Learn about conducting a transitional college goal orientated IEP for students from 8th-12th grade, and how to prepare students with disabilities for the transition from high school to college.

Presenters
avatar for Eric Hartz

Eric Hartz

Post Secondary Coordinator, Madison Metro School District
Dr. Hartz is the Coordinator and lead teacher for the Campus Connect Program for the Madison Metro School District. Campus Connect is a dual enrollment program at Madison College for students with disabilities who require beyond reasonable accommodations in college. He has been specializing... Read More →


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Programs in Evolution: The InclusiveU Initiative at Syracuse University
Postsecondary options for students with intellectual disabilities must highly responsive to changing needs. InclusiveU at Syracuse University is in a constant state of evolution based on our assessment of student needs and their desired outcomes. Come join the discussion about methods to keep programs current.

Presenters
avatar for Bud Buckhout

Bud Buckhout

Director of InclusiveU, Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Higher Education
Stanley or better known as “Bud” Buckhout has worked in education for over 20 years. He earned is Teaching Certificate, Masters in Special Education and A Certificate of Advanced Study from Le Moyne College. He has worked in exploring research and facilitation of groups to aid... Read More →
MF

Micah Fialka-Feldman

Syracuse University


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Promoting Inclusion through a Community of Collaboration and Care in the Classroom
This presentation proposal describes a research study that was embedded into a collaboratively designed and co-taught college art course in which general education and special education teacher candidates were provided opportunities to develop skills and experiences in both art and special education. Teacher candidates learned about inclusive teaching practices that provide art for all children.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Representations of Autonomy After Brain Injury
Most media on traumatic brain injury (TBI) highlights graphic imagery of injuries and hospital stays and testimonies from experts and family members. This approach reinforces a stereotype of survivors as lifelong patients with less insight than professionals. The captioned and audio described documentary "Who Am I To Stop It" foregrounds survivors' narratives from the Cultural Model of Disability. This session will show scenes of a disabled artist asserting his agency and demonstrating dynamic interactions of impairment, relationships, religion, housing, education, work, stigma, pride, and finding purpose. A Co-Director with TBI disabilities and this artist will discuss themes from the film.


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Taking your Service Dog to College: Academic, Residential, and Social Considerations
Taking your Service Dog to College: Academic, Residential, and Social Considerations Making the transition to college can be an exciting yet stressful time. Making the transition to college as a person who uses a service dog can offer unique challenges. All areas of life are impacted including participating in academic life, living in the residence halls, and navigating the campus and classrooms. Students using service dogs not only need to address their own needs and the needs of their service dog, they often become ambassadors for service dog etiquette on campus as well. Service dogs that work for students with disabilities are entitled to full access on college campuses and universities that accept federal funds under the Americans with Disabilities Act. A service dog is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. The dog must perform a task that a person with a disability could not perform independently and that mitigates the disability (i.e., makes the disability less severe, serious, or painful). Prior to arriving on campus, it is recommended that students notify the Office of Disabilities Services that they will be using a service dog on campus. Representatives from this office can help arrange class schedules, and address housing issues if needed. Not all campuses require students with service dogs to register with the Office of Disability Services if no other academic or access accommodations are needed. However, representatives from this office can provide valuable assistance and access to additional resources. Housing may need to be considered prior to arriving on campus, such as securing a room large enough to accommodate a service dog with easy access to a relief area. Roommate selection may be impacted given the presence of the dog. Students also need to consider any special supplies that will be needed to sustain the dog (i.e., food, water, special equipment, and options for veterinary care in the area). Class schedules must be considered as well when using a service dog. Breaks should be planned into the schedule to allow the dog to relieve and provide periodic breaks. The nature of the class (lab versus lecture) must be considered to prepare the dog for the environment. In lecture classes the service dog may need to sit still in a small space close to the handler for an extended time. In science labs, computer labs, or other classes requiring movement around the room, the service dog will be required to reposition often, navigate around specialized equipment, or stay on a mat in a corner of the room outside the path of constant movement. Students can alert professors in advance that a service dog will be attending class. Some professors will be comfortable and experienced with dealing with service animals. Others may need some guidance on service dog etiquette. The student can ask a professor to inform the class that the service dog will be attending. The student also can request an opportunity to address service dog protocol with classmates during the initial class session. In some cases, students will be familiar with the presence of the dog, and no direction is needed. If the dog is used to alert conditions such as impending seizures or low blood sugar, the student may want to inform the professor or a designated student of procedures to follow when the dog alerts. Once the schedule is made, student will need to consider the classroom arrangements, such as the type of seating available and if a larger service animal can fit under a desk or table. The student will need to determine the optimum location for the service dog in the classroom (e.g., an aisle seat away from the door to avoid distractions). The student may also need to determine the best path to navigate through the classroom to help address issues such as other students' reaction to the dog, both positive and negative. Although service dogs have legal access to the classroom, and fear of dogs and allergies are not a reason to remove the dog, the student may need to address the social landscape within the classroom. Social aspects of having a service dog on campus must be considered as well. Transportation time between classes may be impacted. Students who use service dogs on campus indicate that they are often stopped when walking between classes because people ask about their dogs, or they need time to allow the dogs to relieve. As a result, they reported that they were periodically late for class. Acceptance of the service dog and its legitimacy may also be an issue. Students with invisible disabilities have reported being questioned if they actually need the service dog's assistance and if the dog met service dog status. Some incidents of bullying have been reported as well. These issues are not unique to the college setting but may need to be addressed in within this specific environment and through channels offered by the college. For example, some schools offer Service Dog housing to allow individuals who use service dogs to live in a common area to provide social residential support for those bringing service dogs to campus. The purpose of this proposed presentation is to examine the academic, residential, and social issues involved with taking a service dog to campus. This presentation directly addresses the conference theme of Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life by addressing proactive and creative solutions for promoting inclusive post secondary education of individuals with disabilities who use service dogs on college campuses.


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Teacher Perceptions of Culturally Responsive Practices for Diverse Students with Dis/abilities
All children in the United States have the right to an equitable education, regardless of gender, religion, class, race, culture, language, or dis/ability. A critical examination of the socio political and contextual factors that fortify the barriers faced by marginalized groups highlights the need for a culturally responsive approach to educating students with multidimensional identities. This research uses the theoretical framework of Dis/ability Critical Race Studies (DisCrit) to examine how teachers perceive their ability to implement culturally responsive educational practices (CREP) for their Culturally Linguistically Diverse (CLD) students with dis/Abilities, (e.g. Emotional Disturbances, Intellectual Disabilities, and Learning Disabilities), This presentation will share the ways in which teachers describe their meanings and understandings about dis/abilities, race, culture, and language, how their experiences have prepared them to utilize culturally responsive instruction, and how they describe their actions toward implementing the goals of CREP.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Teaching Students with Developmental Disabilities to Sequence Academic Content Using Technology
I used a multiple probe across behaviors design to evaluate the effectiveness of using a video model and constant time delay procedures to teach two high school students to sequence American history/civics topics. Students received their intervention probes from their special education co-taught classroom teacher and me. Topics presented to the student were the same topics students learned within their co-taught setting. As a secondary measure, students verbalized the sequences. Visual analysis indicated a functional relation between the use of video model and constant time delay for one student, while the other student met criteria for all three topics with variable baseline.

Presenters
avatar for Allison Kroesch

Allison Kroesch

Assistant Clinical Professor & Doctoral Student, Illinois State University


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

The Bestsellers List: Scripted Stories (and other Visuals) for All Occasions
This interactive session will explore a variety of purposes for scripted stories and other visuals for children of various ages. Participants will gain strategies to create personalized scripted stories that increase participation in school and the community, support coordination between the school and home environments and address self-regulation and problem-solving Participants will learn how scripted stories and other visual strategies can facilitate transition across school levels through multiple case studies and examples.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

The Importance of Housing Opportunity
Where a person lives affects every aspect of their life. Fair housing laws and policies are in place to ensure equal opportunity in housing. This session will highlight, through discussion, the importance of housing choice and tips for advocating for inclusiveness in your communities.

Presenters
avatar for Vard McGuire

Vard McGuire

Fair Housing Coordinator, Disability Law Center


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

The Training Experiences of AAC Professionals
AAC intervention is a critical part of AAC services for individuals with complex communication needs (CCN). In order to ensure high quality AAC intervention, AAC training for practitioners is essential. Within the field, researchers recommended competencies for practitioners supporting individuals who use AAC (DaFonte & Boesch, 2016). These competencies include: 1) knowledge about communicative development and communicative competency (Filmore & Snow, 2000; Light & McNaughton, 2014); 2) teamwork and collaborative practices (Chung & Douglas, 2014); 3) role and functions of AAC systems (Lebel, Olshtain, & Weiss, 2005); and 4) AAC instructional strategies (McMillan, 2008). Furthermore, it has been shown that AAC competency is essential for educational and therapeutic practitioners due to increases in current case load assignments of children who use AAC (Kent-Walsh, Stark, & Binger, 2008). Yet, AAC training for pre-service speech language pathologists, occupational therapists, and special education teachers remains insufficient (Costigan, & Light, 2010). More training is needed, but given the current pre-service training in the field a combined pre-service/in-service training approach is likely to be essential to support individuals with CCN as they obtain communicative competence (Ratcliff, Koul, & Lloyd, 2008). AAC practitioners (AAC specialists, SLPs with expertise in AAC, etc.) are often utilized to provide the needed training to communication partners (e.g., teachers, paraprofessionals, therapists, family members, peers). However, little is known within the literature about their experiences providing training to communication partners, or their own preparation to provide AAC training to others. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the training experiences of AAC practitioners. Specifically, we sought to gain knowledge to help inform future interventions. The study utilized focus group research methods with AAC practitioners in Michigan to answer the following research questions: (a) What are the facilitators and barriers in practitioners' practices associated with supporting children with complex communication needs (CCN) who utilize augmentative and alternative communication systems (low tech/high tech)?; (b) What training needs are perceived as essential for practitioners when working with children with CCN? Do these essential skills align with the current competency recommendations? (c) What AAC skills or training are lacking for practitioners?; (d) Are there different practitioner training needs associated with the various developmental stages of the child with CCN?; (e) What training do practitioners need to support other communication partners of individuals who use AAC? Data from the study were analyzed using a constant comparative approach to determine underlying themes from data collected during focus groups with participants. Results from the study will be discussed in the context of current AAC training models to support AAC practitioner needs and changes that should be made in the future, including innovative intervention and training methods. Limitations and future research directions based on study results will also be discussed.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

The Transition to Parenthood: Down Syndrome, Mood Disorders and Social Media
The transition to parenthood is fraught with emotional and physical changes. This leads to a high likelihood of parents experiencing mood disorders such as anxiety and depression (Center for Disease Control [CDC], 2011). As many as one in eight women experience Postpartum Depression (PPD) in the United States and this may be exceeded by those with anxiety (CDC, 2016; Fairbrother et al., 2016). This is especially true for parents who are raising a child with a disability. Research has shown that these parents often exhibit higher rates of stress, depression, and anxiety (Miranda et al., 2015). For parents of children with Down syndrome specifically, perinatal depression and anxiety can be a significant concern. This is due to the fact that often these parents are not aware of the diagnosis before giving birth but receive the diagnosis within the first 24-48 hours following (Hall, Bobrow & Marteau, 1999). These parents are expected to cope with the diagnosis and all the new information this entails, with very little emotional support from people outside of family members (van der Veek, Kraaij & Garnefski, 2009). Although this is a common occurrence, there is a large lack of literature on the perinatal experiences of parents who have a child with Down syndrome, and how those experiences impact their mental and emotional well-being. However, many of these parents are very active on social media and in advocacy networks, and often use these outlets to discuss their experiences of receiving a diagnosis. This presentation will provide data and insights regarding perinatal depression and anxiety in parents of children with Down syndrome through an examination of "birth stories" on parent social media (i.e. blog posts, Instagram, facebook, etc.). Social media accounts of individuals who specifically identify in their biographies as a parent of a child with Down syndrome were investigated for stories relating to the time of receiving their child's diagnosis. These social media entries were then extracted, de-identified, and analyzed using thematic analysis and inductive open coding as part of qualitative methodology. The main themes from the analysis will be presented, along with areas of future research. Information for current practitioners and service providers will also be presented.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

TIES Center: The National Technical Assistance Center on Inclusive Practices and Policies
It is a frustrating reality that students with significant cognitive disabilities continue to be educated in separate placements and settings where exposure to the general education classroom, peers, and core curriculum is limiting, despite advances in identifying effective and practical inclusion tools and strategies for serving students with disabilities. TIES Center was funded a year ago by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) as the new National Technical Assistance Center on Inclusive Practices and Policies. In this session, we will then share TIES Center's vision for the future, and how TIES Center is working to address the complex and interrelated root causes that contribute to the barriers that negatively impact students with significant cognitive disabilities. This presentation aligns with the theme of "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" by describing how TIES Center is learning from partnering with a state to work intensively on implementing and sustaining policies and practices designed to bring about real change. The session will conclude with a discussion about how to "tie" all the pieces together to successfully implement and sustain inclusive education.


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Training Communication Partners: Know Better, Do Better
We receive many requests for trained communication partners to support people who type or point to communicate. As a result, we have developed a training that introduces staff to the field and techniques, while determining goodness of fit. AAC users weigh into this training, which is a living, breathing resource that changes as we learn and grow. We believe that when we know better, we do better.

Presenters
avatar for Molly K. Rearick

Molly K. Rearick

Founder & Director, Reid's Gift, Inc.
avatar for Dan Rosien

Dan Rosien

Dan The Man, Reids Gift, Inc.
Under the waves of my unruly bodyLies a mind as deep as the seaThough my face does not showAny part of all i knowMy soul feels the hot and cold currents beneath


Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:30pm

Trends in the Educational Placement of Students with Intellectual Disabilities
Despite a federal mandate for students with disabilities to be educated alongside their peers without disabilities to the maximum degree appropriate, many students with intellectual disability continue to be educated primarily in segregated settings. In this poster presentation, I will share my findings from analysis of 40 years of federally reported data on the educational placement of students with intellectual disability. Specifically, I examined the degree placements have trended toward less restrictive environments. I found historical trends of incremental progress toward less restrictive settings, but no evidence of such progress in recent years. Furthermore, most students were educated predominantly in segregated settings every year. I discuss how these findings relate to previous studies, as well as implications for IEP teams and advocates for educational inclusion.

Presenters

Thursday November 29, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon E - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

5:45pm

AAC Users Meet & Chat
This is an informal meet and chat for those who use devices, keyboards and letterboards to get to know others from around the country, and have discussions together!

Moderators
Thursday November 29, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

7:00pm

#2018TASHbash Dance
Come join us for an evening of celebrating and connecting at the #2018TASHbash - hosted by the Self Advocacy Committee!  Dance the night away to hip-hop tunes provided by Portland's very own DJ Lamar.
Hearty appetizers will be served.

Thank you to our #2018TASHbash sponsor, Anthem, Inc.

Sponsors
avatar for Anthem, Inc.

Anthem, Inc.

Anthem is working to transform health care with trusted and caring solutions. Our health plan companies deliver quality products and services that give their members access to the care they need. With over 73 million people served by its affiliated companies, including nearly 40 million... Read More →



Thursday November 29, 2018 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201
 
Friday, November 30
 

7:00am

Registration Open
Check in and get your name badge here! Registration will be open during these hours.

Thank you to our lanyard sponsor, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network!

Sponsors
avatar for Spaulding Rehabilitation Network

Spaulding Rehabilitation Network

A member of Partners HealthCare, the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network includes Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, as well as Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Cape Cod, Spaulding Hospital Cambridge and Spaulding Nursing and Therapy Center Brighton, as well as twenty-five outpatient... Read More →


Friday November 30, 2018 7:00am - 12:00pm
Registration Desk - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

7:30am

Inclusive Education Committee Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Inclusive Education committee monthly meeting

Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Deborah Taub

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions

Friday November 30, 2018 7:30am - 8:15am
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

7:30am

Missouri TASH Chapter Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

All are welcome to join Missouri TASH members. If you are interested in finding out how to connect with others in Missouri or nearby Midwestern states - come on by!

Moderators
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Friday November 30, 2018 7:30am - 8:20am
Hospitality Suite - Room 1624 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Exhibit Hall
Stop by the Exhibit Hall (Salon A) until 12:00 pm PT today to support small businesses and organizations that practice inclusion across the country.

Friday November 30, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Salon A - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Relaxation Room
A low-sensory relaxation room is available for all TASH conference attendees; located on the Lobby level near the escalators.

Friday November 30, 2018 8:00am - 5:00pm
Willamette - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:29am

About Breakout Sessions
Breakout Presentations are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Friday November 30, 2018 8:29am - 4:10pm
All Meeting Floors

8:30am

A Matched Comparison Study of Students in Inclusive vs Segregated Settings
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will present findings from a mixed methods study which compared the instructional days of students with disabilities in inclusive vs. segregated settings; and, compared their overall progress educationally over time. Specifically, 32 matched pairs of students (16 in inclusive classrooms and 16 in separate classes) in the same school district were observed over a full school day. Results of these observations will be shared. In addition, data on educational progress over time was taken for the 16 pairs of students, and analyses of these data will be shared.

Presenters

Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Assuring Autonomy - Taking Affirmative Steps to Assure Autonomy by Avoiding Guardianship
Limited Capacity seats available

The presentation will describe the steps taken by a public managed care organization and a non-profit managed care organization to avoid guardianships. Every adult has the right to autonomy, to make life decisions, to direct his/her life and to be treated with dignity. Guardianship strips individuals of their legal rights. All autonomous adults need and get advice and counsel when making different life decisions. Person Centered Planning and Self-Determination require that adults with disabilities are respected and honored to make life decisions, with the support and counsel they need. These practices when done properly strengthen the circle of support around the individual with a disability, providing both the counsel and framework for preserving the individual's autonomy and decision making and renders guardianship unnecessary. This presentation will describe the policy and organization changes that were made by both a public and a private agency, built on the principles of Person Centered Planning and Self-determination, to shift control away from professional staff, licensing and guardianship agencies to people who in growing numbers have taken control of their lives and live in homes they own or rent, with housemates and support staff of their choice.

Presenters
avatar for Dohn Hoyle

Dohn Hoyle

Director of Public Policy, The Arc Michigan
Dohn Hoyle is the currently the Director of Public Policy (formerly the Executive Director) of The Arc of Michigan and a long-time advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. A respected leader and innovator in the disability movement, Dohn helped to rewrite the Michigan... Read More →
PN

Paul Newman

Chief Operating Officer, Community Living Services


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Beyond Tokenism: How can your Organization include People with Developmental Disabilities on Boards, Councils and Committees?
Limited Capacity seats available

The presentation will include real examples of best practices from organizations currently at the cutting edge of full inclusion on board of directors, governmental bodies, and decision-making entities. The focus of the presentation will be identifying and understanding the effective actions organizations are currently using to effectively include self-advocates in policy-making bodies. Handouts of actual policies, by-laws, and materials currently being used by best practice organizations will be shared. Participants will learn about and use the newly developed self-assessment tool for successfully including self-advocates on policy-making bodies.

Presenters
avatar for Mark Friedman

Mark Friedman

Associate Professor, City University of New York (CUNY)
1. People with disabilities serving on boards of directors and policy making bodies. | 2. Online teaching. | 3. Disability Studies
avatar for Tia Nelis

Tia Nelis

Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of... Read More →


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Creating a Low/No Cost Inclusive Transition Program on a College Campus
Limited Capacity seats available

Bellingham School District and Western Washington University have been working on creating an innovative solution for including students in the school district's transition program into the university community. This session will outline the process that is being followed to develop a collaborative effort and create an inclusive program offering transition students opportunities to experience campus life. We will discuss the process that has created a collaboration that, thus far, has not been a financial burden on either party, yet will allow transition students to register for college credit to work on transition skills. But more importantly, will give transition students increased access to campus life; including a student ID card, access to all student events, campus clubs, use of a peer mentor program, and other campus services. We will discuss the steps being taken to increase the program to a fully inclusive certificated program. We will discuss the process used to create and pass a program with no outside funding into action, and the steps needed to expand the program into a fully inclusive program that allows transition students to work towards completion of a certificated program as matriculated students.


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Friends Matter! A Multi-method Study of Social Opportunities in an Inclusive District
Limited Capacity seats available

Friendships are personally valuable and developmentally important relationships for all people, yet friendships between students with and without intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) remain infrequent, even in inclusive classrooms and schools. To address this challenge, this study examined a) student social interactions through naturalistic observation in inclusive settings, b) student perspectives on friendships through focus group interviews with students with and without disabilities, and c) student social preferences and classroom connections through social network analysis. The setting included two elementary schools, one middle school, and one high school in a school district that valued inclusive education in the northeastern United States. This presentation aligns with the conference's "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" theme in that it emphasizes the possibility and benefits of friendship for all students, as well as the importance of social opportunities more so than students' social skills in friendship development.

Presenters

Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

From Apart to A Part: Facilitating Community Engagement as a Self-Directed Outcome
Limited Capacity seats available

Barriers to full inclusion often extend beyond the reaches of traditional support services and programs. While such systems may assist in reducing or eliminating communication, physical, or behavioral barriers, existing societal perceptions and misconceptions still preclude full integration into the life of the community. Institutions may be closing, but institutional thinking is alive and well. Training on rights, self-determination, inclusion, and person-centered practice can be provided by agencies to individuals and those who are paid to support them, but who is ultimately responsible for educating the community on these subjects? Drawing from the stories of two completely different men who successfully overcame these barriers and transitioned from isolated institutions to engaging full lives as valued members of their respective communities, this presentation will address these barriers, as well as discuss outcome-based strategies for paid supports to become community liaisons, educating and empowering individuals and their communities to build natural relationships with each other.

Presenters
avatar for Joseph Grabowski

Joseph Grabowski

Service Coordinator, Upper Valley Services
Working for people with intellectual disabilities isn't just my career, it's been my lifelong passion. | | Over the last 33 years, I've worked in two group homes, a state school, a camp for the disabled, a sheltered workshop, as well as a job coach, a community integrator, a... Read More →


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Eugene - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Inclusive Strategy for Teaching Sight Words Promoting Reading for Individuals with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Students with disabilities, especially significant disabilities, are many times overlooked in the general education classroom as well as in self-contained classrooms when it comes to learning to read. Educators do not always realize the potential individuals with disabilities have for accessing print when taught using research based interventions. Students with disabilities need to be prepared for future transition goals from the time they begin school. Reading is an essential skill for transition and other goals that students with even very significant disabilities can attain. This research discussion will provide participants with an opportunity to learn a research -based strategy (constant time delay) that can be used in inclusive classroom settings to teach students with disabilities to read sight words as well as other content area vocabulary. Increasing student sight word recognition alleviates overload of cognitive capacities freeing up cognitive resources that allow students to make progress in reading. This strategy can be used at all levels of education, in all settings, and can be implemented by a variety of professionals and, in some cases, a peer student learner giving all students more opportunities for access and meaningful engagement in the inclusive settings.

Presenters

Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Belmont - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

PATH as a Tool to Develop Quality of Life Educational Outcomes for Students with Complex Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Inclusion Outreach (IO) is a multidisciplinary British Columbia Ministry of Education Provincial Outreach Program that supports 120 students with complex needs to be included in schools throughout the province. IO and Open School BC partnered to develop an e-mentoring project using a learning management system (LMS) to create secure, password-protected student specific websites as information repositories. IO has incorporated PATH (Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope) as a tool to guide the development of relevant, future oriented educational programs for students we support. This presentation aligns with the 2018 theme "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" by describing an approach to support inclusive education that enhances current and future quality-of-life for students with complex support needs. More information is available at www.inclusionoutreach.ca.

Presenters
avatar for Sarah Skinner

Sarah Skinner

Occupational Therapist, Provincial Inclusion Outreach Program
I work with the Provincial Inclusion Outreach Program, which is funded by the Ministry of Education of British Columbia to support school teams across the province of BC to facilitate inclusive education for students with significant disabilities. I work with an interdisciplinary... Read More →


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Portrait of Competence-The Intersection of Employment and Person Centered Planning
Limited Capacity seats available

Presenter will illustrate how to increase placement for people with significant disabilities and improve job match through the use of person centered planning specifically tailored for job development, assessment and employer approach through building a precise portrait of competence.

Presenters

Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Salmon - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Putting the "Inclusive" in "Inclusive Higher Education"
Limited Capacity seats available

Higher education programs across the country are breaking new ground in supporting students with intellectual disability in going to college. Data from the TPSID model demonstration program for students with intellectual disability shows that students have accessed thousands of inclusive college courses since 2010. Yet too many programs feel the need to still offer separate courses using a specialized curriculum. This session will present emerging research on the importance of inclusive college courses and share examples of innovative practices that create inclusive college course access. One higher education program at Portland State University will present their approach to creating an authentic inclusive postsecondary education. A self-advocate will speak about the importance of being included in higher education. An overarching theme for this presentation is a call for an end to the use of segregated instruction in higher education. We challenge attendees to be creative and find innovative solutions to teaching foundational skills for college success in naturally occurring settings. The purpose of this session is to advocate for increased efforts to support students with intellectual disability, many of whom have significant disabilities, to access an inclusive college course of study and to end practices that result in the segregation of college students with intellectual disability into separate classes using a specialized curriculum. Higher education for students with intellectual disability (ID) has evolved from a strongly family- and self-advocate led grassroots effort to a national movement guided by legislation, the Higher Education Opportunities Act 2008. Opportunities exist for students with significant support needs to attend college as a result of both grassroots and legislative advocacy and activism. These efforts are effecting change in higher education. Yet there is great variability in the extent to which higher education programs serving students with intellectual disability are inclusive. Emerging research is demonstrating statistically meaningful evidence that separate instruction in segregated courses does not support students to obtain meaningful inclusive life outcomes, therefore arguments that students with intellectual disability need separate and special life skills, career development, or social skills instruction delivered in group settings are false. Moreover, teaching college students with intellectual disability in segregated, group instruction goes against the concept of accessing higher education as a way to continue learning with same-age peers in order to achieve inclusive post-college outcomes just like their peers without disabilities. In this session, we call for an end to segregated instruction in higher education, in direct alignment with TASH’s mission to “promote the full inclusion and participation of children and adults with significant disabilities in every aspect of their community, and to eliminate the social injustices that diminish human rights.” As with TASH’s mission, we realize this effort through education and research, and we offer examples of “Individualized, quality supports” that can be used “in place of congregate and segregated settings and services.” Segregation is no longer viewed as acceptable in K-12 education, segregation is no longer acceptable in employment, and segregation is no longer acceptable in community living — therefore it is more than time to end segregation in higher education.

Presenters
avatar for Clare Papay

Clare Papay

Senior Research Associate, Think College, UMass Boston


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Douglas/Fir - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Supplementary Aids and Services: Patterns and Implications for Inclusive Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Supplementary aids and services have been a requirement in special education law since PL 94-142, however, little guidance has been provided to support teams to make appropriate decisions about selection and implementation. In this content analysis of 88 Individual Education Programs (IEPs), our team explores the number and types of supplementary aids and services given to students with significant support needs in grades K-12. Results demonstrated a range of supplementary aids and services for students. The most common identified supports were curricular accommodations and personnel supports. Less common were curricular supports (e.g., curricular modifications ) and supports that assisted students in communication and make meaning of the curriculum (e.g., curricular modifications). Based on this study's results, we provide implications for policy, practice, and research to further support inclusive education of students with significant support needs.

Presenters
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Katie McCabe

Katie McCabe

University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Sunstone - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Supporting Students with Autism Using Strategy Instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation is a perfect example of creativity and “thinking outside the box”. The presenters will describe a technique for teaching writing that is often used with students with high incidence disabilities, but in the present study is extended to students with high support needs. Here, the presenters will demonstrate ways to use strategy instruction to support literacy skills in students with autism.


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Meadowlark - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

The Impact of a Study Abroad Experience for Professionals and Graduate Students who Work with Low Incidence Populations
Limited Capacity seats available

We will share the impact of conducting a study abroad course to Botswana, Africa on the participants' ability to create curricular projects/activities using 21st Century Standards and the integration of African culture and language. These plans will be used to teach cultural diversity lessons to North Carolina K-12 students, students with severe disabilities will be included in the lessons. Special education teachers and speech and language pathologist will partner together to facilitate inclusion. In this session, the presenters will share lecture, pictures, video and examples of lesson plans created by the study abroad participants. A total of 12 professionals from North Carolina participated in a study abroad course. There were 4 speech and language pathologist, 4 speech and language pathology graduate students, 4 special education teachers (low incidence) and 4 special education graduate students (adapted curriculum). The participants traveled to Botswana in the summer of 2018 through a Fulbright-Hays Group Project Abroad (GPA) Program. This GPA program focused on an exchange of information about educational practices in the United States and Botswana with a focus on speech-language pathology and special education for low incidence disabilities in school settings. The participants attended 12 cultural activities such as safaris, farmer's markets, Victoria Falls, etc. They received in country Setswana language instruction from Botswana educators. The participants visited 8 schools across Botswana to observe instruction for students with low incidence disabilities and acquire information about school services and instruction practices. The speech and language pathologist were paired with the special education professionals and the professionals in the Botswana schools to create curriculum projects about the language, history, culture and art of Botswana. These resources will be shared with attendees at this workshop, so they may use them in their school practice to enrich the cultural competence of students in the United States.

Presenters
avatar for Karena Cooper-Duffy

Karena Cooper-Duffy

Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

What is Student's Role in Determining Positive Behavior Intervention Supports Plans?
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will examine the extent and nature to which students with severe disabilities help develop, monitor, and evaluate their own behavioral support plans. Although the ultimate goal of support plans is to promote autonomy and self-determination, behavioral support plans appear to be largely developed by external stakeholders and not students. The findings of a teacher survey will be shared, and the practical implications of these findings will be discussed.

Presenters
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at... Read More →
RC

Richard Carter

University of Wyoming
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal... Read More →


Friday November 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:20am
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

"I have a disability but it doesn't have me."
Limited Capacity seats available

'I have a disability but it doesn't have me. Michael Rogers used to let his disability define him. He believed in the limitations people told him he should have because he had cerebral palsy, dyslexia, and spent most of his time in a wheel chair. Then he met Lisa Swihart, a counselor who challenged his thinking around his disability. She called him to think outside the box others put him in. She helped him see that he could do far more things than he had been taught he was capable of. He shifted his thinking from being disabled to being a man with a disability. Things took off for him and he started pursuing his dreams. He no longer is ashamed of his wheel chair and will talk about how his mindset shift changed and saved his life. He will share his experience of learning to use an ATM machine, practicing reading, and getting a job working at two ball fields in Seattle to support the fans during Seahawks, Sounders and Mariners games. This work was in addition to his full time State job. Michael and Lisa will speak together about the importance of seeing beyond the disability and not letting others define people based on their disabilities. They will provide questions that professionals and those with disabilities can ask to discover their limiting thoughts and beliefs, and emphasize the importance of having someone remind a person with a disability that they are not as limited as they believe they are.


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Portland - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

A Day in the Life of an Inclusion Facilitator and Other Practical Strategies for Successful Inclusive Practices
Limited Capacity seats available

Facilitating inclusive educational environments is a unique job with dynamic responsibilities. From creating collaborative partnerships, to developing behavioral and social supports, IEP goals, and accessible curriculum, the job is constantly evolving and immensely rewarding. Whether you're someone who has been in this role for years, someone just starting out, or someone interested in promoting inclusive practices at your school site, this is for you. In this session, participants will learn about a day in the life of an inclusion facilitator as well as practical tips and tricks to developing and sustaining a successful inclusive classroom. This session will provide participants with an hour by hour example of what it's like to create educational access within general education classrooms for students with the most unique needs. In addition, participants will learn practical tips such as scheduling and planning techniques, universal design strategies, modification and accommodation techniques, collaborative teaming approaches, and more. To conclude, presenters will welcome participant questions, comments and concerns and will provide time and space for an active whole group discussion.


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Columbia - First Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Better Together! Fostering Collaboration and Mutual Participation among Students with Significant Disabilities and Their Classmates
Limited Capacity seats available

This interactive skill-building session presents innovative, research-informed strategies and activities that can be used to foster collaboration and active participation among students with significant disabilities and their typical peers, during general education classroom instruction and inclusive school activities. Varied creative tactics that foster students’ active engagement, positive performance, personal autonomy, and mutual participation WITH typical peers, within and across general education settings, will additionally be illustrated and discussed. Door prizes related to session content will be awarded.

Presenters
avatar for Jan Writer

Jan Writer

Benedictine University
Jan Writer is the Director of Student Placement at Benedictine University and an adjunct professor of Special Education at National Louis University. She is also the Principal Consultant for Visions & Dreams, an independent agency that provides technical assistance, training, and... Read More →


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Belmont - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Creating the Change We Need: Leadership Training for Self-Advocates
Limited Capacity seats available

Project ACTION! is a successful established self-advocacy group in Washington, DC. Current leaders realized that there needed to be many more self-advocacy leaders if they were going to address all of the issues they hear about at meetings AND if they were going to create needed changes. Therefore, they developed a 6-month leadership training program and recruited current and potential members interested in taking charge of their lives and making changes that are important to them. Sessions focused on Finding Your Voice, Identifying Issues that are Important to You, Taking Charge of Your Life, Running and Participating in Meetings, Serving on Boards, Talking So That People Will Listen, and the many roles played by self-advocates. This session will review the fun interactive training, with role-playing so that people can practice and learn in safe non-threatening ways, pairing new and experienced self-advocates to build skills and confidence.


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Disability and Leadership Through the Lifespan
Limited Capacity seats available

Our initial inclusive research with about 250 adults with disabilities about their leadership experiences led to some helpful findings but also to more questions. One theme was the complex relationship between family, people with disabilities and schools. Following up on this, our two new qualitative research projects examine the remembered experiences of adult leaders with disabilities of their early childhood experiences of leadership and current best practice experiences of school children in two British Columbia schools. Do these early memories increase the capacity of adults to seize leadership opportunities in their lives, groups and communities? Through a leadership lens, what is working well for students in schools and those who support them? What can we learn about better supporting children with disabilities, their families and schools? This social constructionist approach looks for new ways to conduct research that is "future forming," as Kenneth Gergen says, and will lead to changes in the lives of children and adults with disabilities. It partners researchers, self advocates trained in inclusive research, and teaching staff in dialogues made accessible through the use of graphic recording and performance. Through this work networks of influence and connection are increased and more effectively leveraged.

Presenters
avatar for Liz Etmanski

Liz Etmanski

Elizabeth Etmanski is an Artist based in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada. Having won an award for her artistic passions in Secondary School, she went on to become the first person with Down Syndrome to graduate from the Emily Carr University of Art and Design... Read More →
avatar for Aaron Johannes

Aaron Johannes

Director of Training, Research and Development, Spectrum Society
Spectrum Society supports about 140 folks in their neighbourhoods in individualised ways in greater Vancouver. We have also been involved in small press publishing, self advocate supports, community based research and training for other groups. I am also a board member for TLC in... Read More →



Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Eugene - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Disability Informed Practice: Transforming Inclusive Learning Environments
Limited Capacity seats available

Teachers can sometimes struggle to fully understand and value the contributions of children with disabilities, negatively impacting both the students with disabilities in their classrooms and the overall social climate in which children without disabilities learn to perceive their peers. Life-changing events and first-hand experiences facing barriers and social inequity within the world of disability provided the presenters with additional insight and a new frame with which to view inclusive practice. This significantly strengthened their core values as inclusive teacher educators at both the undergraduate and graduate level and transformed their approach in leading teachers to critically examine the role of culture and practice in inclusive classrooms. In this session, the presenters will share how their experiences informed their practice; they will provide specific strategies in how to engage teachers in research-based learning activities and reflection to transform their perceptions of people with disabilities. They will also discuss the tools they employ to help teachers become advocates for people with disabilities, eliminate barriers, and provide equity and social justice while leading classrooms in increasingly uncertain times.

Presenters
avatar for Cynthia Kerber Gowan

Cynthia Kerber Gowan

Faculty Liaison, LifePrep@Naz, Nazareth College


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Facilitating Engagement in Inclusive Classrooms for Students with Extensive Support Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Limited research exists that describes how to include students with extensive support needs (ESN) in grade-level literacy instruction in inclusive classrooms. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to explore the relationship between the teaching strategies educators use during literacy instruction in general education classrooms and the engagement of students with ESN who are included in those classrooms. An additional purpose of this study was to investigate how educators learned about the teaching strategies they used and the reasons they selected those particular strategies. To answer the research questions in this study, we observed eight students with ESN and the educators who supported them in two fully inclusive elementary schools. During this session, participants will learn about the innovative ways students with ESN were supported to participate in grade level literacy activities that targeted skills in comprehension, phonological awareness, and vocabulary, to name a few. Further, participants will gain an insight in to the ways educators learned about these strategies. This information can be helpful for advancing inclusive education.

Presenters
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Kirsten Lansey

Kirsten Lansey

Doctoral Student, University of Arizona


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Pearl - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

From Barn to Yarn: Becca's Journey to a Meaningful Life through Microenterprise
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session, we'll share the story of Becca's Alpacas, what was involved in creating this microenterprise, and how it has developed over the past six years. Becca raises alpacas, and after they are shorn, she processes the fleece into yarn and makes felted art and objects for sale. Participants will learn what is necessary to make a microenterprise succeed. Becca will take you through the steps of caring for the alpacas, turning their fleece into fiber products, and how her dream of a storefront has become a reality. We'll discuss what supports have been successful, and most importantly share the joy of spending working hours creatively and in an endeavor that brings meaning to life.


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Salmon - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Getting Published in Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities (RPSD)
Limited Capacity seats available

Come meet the editors of Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities (RPSD) to learn more about publishing in the journal associated with TASH! RPSD publishes innovative research that furthers understanding about how to improve the lives of people with severe disabilities. This session is designed for anyone conducting research or aspiring to conduct research in the field of severe disabilities. The session will provide an overview of the types of manuscripts published in RPSD and the peer review process, followed by time for participants to ask questions and obtain input on their publication ideas.

Presenters
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Impact of Interventions to Promote Self-Determination in the Transition to Integrated Employment for Adolescents with Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

This study reports findings from the first two years of statewide implementation of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction (SDLMI) and Whose Future is it? by teachers working with students with intellectual disability in secondary transition to promote skills, knowledge, and beliefs that will lead to opportunities for meaningful integrated employment post school. Results suggest students gained self-determination skills and made progress in attaining goals related to the transition to employment. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Presenters
avatar for Kathryn Burke

Kathryn Burke

Doctoral Student, University of Kansas


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Douglas/Fir - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Increasing Teacher Competence in Response Prompting Procedures by Using Behavioral Skills Training
Limited Capacity seats available

Textbooks in severe disabilities (e.g., Westling et al., 2015) typically include written descriptions and examples of response-prompting procedures. Extensive research demonstrates efficacy of response-prompting with students with disabilities for acquisition of a variety of skills (Cengher et al., 2018). Response-prompting procedures are recognized as an evidence-based practice (EBP) for students with severe disabilities (Browder et al., 2014). However, research on teaching teachers how to implement response-prompting procedures with accuracy and fidelity is far less common. Behavioral skills training (BST) is recognized as an evidence-based practice for staff training (Parsons et al., 2012) and has been applied in teaching graduate students to implement cognitive behavior therapy (Hassan et al., 2017), teaching graphing skills to graduate students (Kranak et al., 2018), and improving pre-service teachers' implementation of EBPs for students with autism (Sawyer et al., 2017). However, there is need to expand use of BST in teaching use of response-prompting. The BST protocol consists of (1) describing the target skill; (2) providing a succinct, written description of the skill; (3) demonstrating the skill; (4) requiring the trainee to practice the target skill; (5) provide feedback during practice; and (6) repeat steps 4 and 5 to mastery (Parsons et al., 2012). This presentation will discuss the evolution of strategies to teach graduate students to implement response-prompting procedures with accuracy and fidelity. The graduate course targeting these procedures is typically taught either online (combination of synchronous and asynchronous meetings) or as a hybrid; both course delivery methods can provide challenges in developing student competence in specific skills that might typically involve role play in a face-to-face classroom. The instructional evolution progressed from only written instructions in early semesters to students submitting videos for feedback in subsequent semesters to the inclusion of a few videos modeling the procedures. Ultimately, in the most recent semester, a more comprehensive BST procedure was used with far more success in developing student competence. The current BST process highlights each response prompting procedure in isolation (a one-at-a-time approach) and consists of (1) Posted readings explaining the process; (2) Instructor notes highlighting key aspects of the response-prompting procedure; (3) A video demonstration of the response-prompting procedure developed by either the instructor or graduate assistant (with an accompanying written instructional plan); (4) Student use of a procedural integrity checklist to review and critique the instructor-provided video with instructor video feedback provided on the critique; (5) Student submission of a video demonstrating use of the response-prompting procedure with an adult with submission of an accompanying instructional plan and a procedural integrity checklist and written self-critique; instructor feedback subsequently provided; (6) Student submission of a video demonstrating use of the response-prompting procedure with a K-12 student with an intellectual disability (with parent permission). The graduate student also submitted an accompanying instructional plan and a procedural integrity checklist and written self-critique; instructor feedback was subsequently provided. Graduate student performance data will be shared as will be end-of-the-semester social validity data. Social validity data indicated that the graduate students found all aspects of the BST process beneficial in learning to implement the response-prompting procedures with accuracy and fidelity. Data for six response prompting procedures will be shared: (1) least-to-most prompting; (2) most-to-least prompting; (3) progressive time delay; (4) constant time delay; (5) graduated guidance; and (6) simultaneous prompting.


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Sunstone - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Parent Leadership and Civic Engagement: Suggestions for the Next IDEA Reauthorization
Limited Capacity seats available

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was last reauthorized in 2004 and is due to be updated again, presenting a long-overdue opportunity to improve the education of over six million children with disabilities. Despite parental participation being a core IDEA principle and parents being experts on both their children and the experience of receiving special education services, individual parent input has been frequently under-represented during the opportunity to provide feedback in prior reauthorizations. Culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) parents may feel especially disempowered to advocate due to systemic barriers. The impending reauthorization of IDEA presents a prime opportunity to increase civic engagement by CLD parents of children with disabilities. In this study, we asked parents of children with disabilities across four states to provide videotaped testimonies about their concerns and suggested changes regarding IDEA. This focus aligns with the conference's "Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" theme in that it represents a novel approach to parent advocacy with its broader focus on civic engagement and contributes needed research about parent civic engagement in the context of the eventual IDEA reauthorization.


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Meadowlark - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Practice Guides for Universally Designing School-wide Positive Behavior Supports to Promote Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

There are over 25,000 schools that implement School-Wide Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (SWPBIS), a multi-tiered behavioral framework that seeks to provide a continuum of supports that benefit all students (Carr et al.., 2002). However, there remain concerns about the accessibility of SWPBIS for students with severe disabilities (e.g., Kurth & Enyart, 2016; Landers, Courtade, & Ryndak, 2012). Teachers have reported that they lack knowledge of fundamental principles of SWPBIS and how to support students with more intensive needs in their classrooms (Chitiyo & Wheeler, 2009). Loman, Strickland-Cohen, and Walker (2018) applied adapted lesson plans to make SWPBIS accessible for students with severe disabilities that resulted in decreased problem behavior. This presentation will share practice guides that outline practices, tools, and examples of how schools and teachers can effectively use the principles of Universal Design for Learning and Evidence-Based Practices (Browder et al., 2014) to promote the accessibility of SWPBIS for students with severe disabilities in inclusive settings. The tools that will be presented are based on research that reflects student performance and can be used to inform, create, or modify a teacher's instructional techniques. Examples that will be presented include, but are not limited to: social narratives, video modeling, task analysis, prompting, visual supports, and systematic instruction to teach school-wide positive behavioral expectations in general education settings. Additionally, we will provide planning tools that help school teams develop their capacity to design and implement school-wide supports that seek to effectively include all students. This presentation aligns with the theme of "Be Creative: Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life" by providing general education teachers with practical and effective tools that align with Universal Design for Learning principles to teach all students positive behavioral expectations in inclusive settings.

Presenters
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education, Illinois State University
Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Illinois State University. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with low incidence disabilities in Atlanta, Georgia before attending the University... Read More →


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Salon H - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Time Well Spent Together: Person-Centered Planning and Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention
Limited Capacity seats available

Several studies indicate that people with disabilities may be at a higher risk for suicide. Although the suicide rate among people with disabilities is not known (Giannini et al., 2010), the presence of specific disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis (Giannini et al., 2010) as well as emotional behavioral disorders (Fleischmann, Bertolote, Belfer, & Beautrais, 2005) may increase suicide risk., 2011). Suicide risk factors impacting all people may come into play as well but may not be fully recognized and acknowledged in people with disabilities (Grill, 1998). It is time to think outside the box about how to address suicide risk and protective factors for people with disabilities. While a lack of true numbers for suicide deaths among people with disabilities presents a challenge, more important is the need to overcome the negative expectation for people with disabilities. When non-disabled persons construe a person's disability to be an overwhelming hardship, it prevents consideration and examination of any other suicide risk factors and thus to even consider evidence-based best practices for suicide prevention. (Weiss, 2015). In the limited research on risk factors for suicide among people with disabilities, the factors are often like non-disabled people (relationships, financial problems, job issues). In fact, perceived burdensomeness and a sense of not belonging or fitting in are strong risk factor for both people with disabilities and non-disabled persons. (Joiner, 2005) Person centered planning promotes connectedness to individuals, family, community, and social institutions - a fundamental protective factor to alleviate suicide risk. Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope (PATH) development serves to actualize these supports. PATH development may be important time to discuss suicide risk factors with the person and their support network, as well as serve as changing the stigma and false narrative that there is no joy, success or accomplishment for a person with disabilities. Efforts to identify risk factors and prevent suicide in people with disabilities are needed, yet few suicide-screening devices exist for people with disabilities in general, and for individuals with intellectual disabilities in particular (Salvatore, et al., 2016). General screening tools can be used, but they may be inaccessible to people using alternate formats or not adapted for use for individuals who require support with reading or abstract thinking (Ludi, et al., 2012). Basic suicide prevention techniques such as Question, Persuade and Refer (QPR) have the potential to be effectively used or adapted for individuals with disabilities. QPR is gatekeeper training in which individuals are taught to recognize suicide warning signs, ask questions to assess the risk, persuading a person to seek help, and refer them for assistance. Providing QPR training to people with disabilities and within the disability community may serve to recognize and prevent suicide risk factors. This presentation aligns with the conference theme of Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life in several ways. Presenters will explain how existing methods such as person centered planning and PATH can aid in suicide prevention. The presenters will also explore means for making existing suicide screening tools and prevention methods, such as QPR, more accessible for individuals with disabilities. The purpose of the proposed presentation is to .... 1. Increase awareness of suicide risk factors and prevention factors 2. Identify barriers to suicide screening and suicide prevention that may exist for individuals with disabilities 3. Examine existing practices, such as a comprehensive approach to suicide and person-centered planning that could provide support and diminish suicide risk factors among individuals with disabilities 4. Explore how gatekeeper trainings such as QPR could be used effectively with individuals with disabilities and within the disability community 5. Brainstorm ways in which suicide screening and prevention could be made more accessible


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Views of Advocacy and Support: Parent Perspectives in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation describes the results of six focus groups comprised of culturally and linguistically diverse parents of adolescents with disabilities. Supports that racially, ethnically, and linguistically diverse families draw upon within their communities, schools, families, and within the individual are described. Results reveal a multitude of interacting factors that influence parents in decision-making and advocacy for their children. A training for diverse families that focuses on transition is described.

Presenters

Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Salon G - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

9:35am

Communications Working Group Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

We encourage all committee members and those interested in learning more about communication access to please join us!

Moderators
Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Hospitality Suite - Room 1624 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:45am

"The Myth of the Normal Child: An Introduction to Disability Studies in Education"
Limited Capacity seats available

What does a "normal" child look like? At what point are individual differences and variations perceived as a disability? In this session, participants will be introduced to core concepts in Disability Studies that will challenge their current conceptualizations of what it means to have a disability. Using Larvae's (2000) framework of critical reflection, participants will engage in an examination of their personal beliefs and assumptions about human potential and learning and will consider the ethical implications of their teaching practices. Participants will leave the session with strategies to foster discussions at their school sites and to engage in ongoing reflection.

Presenters

Friday November 30, 2018 10:45am - 11:35am
Medford - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:45am

A Lesson in Restraint: Keeping Teachers and Students Safer in the Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

Teaching individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities is not only an extremely rewarding career, it can also be one of the most demanding. In a special needs classroom, teachers often encounter children with challenging behavior. Outbursts can be severe and even include aggressive language, destruction of property, self-inflicted injury or physically acting out towards another student or teacher. How teachers choose to respond can have a lasting impact on the children in their care - it can either decrease or increase the chance of injury to one's self or to the student. While no teacher relishes the idea of using coercive techniques like restraint and seclusion, in flashpoint moments, they can seem like the quickest path to defusing a situation. The truth is that these techniques, far from helping children, actually reinforce behaviors of concern. Research indicates that such interventions actually cause and maintain aggression and violence thereby inviting opportunities for injury to the student, the teacher and others in the classroom. Therefore, using them in an attempt to make the classroom safer is misguided. A recent report released by the Office for Civil Rights indicates that restraint and seclusion are not only harmful but may be discriminatory toward students with disabilities. Despite representing only 12% of the public school population, students with disabilities comprise two-thirds of the 267,000 children who are physically restrained or secluded from their classmates annually. When disproportionately used on students with disabilities, schools are violating the guarantee, under IDEA, of a Free and Public Education by reducing time spent in the classroom and creating unequal educational opportunity. While subjected to these practices, students are not receiving educational instruction or services. These practices also create a negative impact on relationships between students and educators. Why, then, are these techniques still being used? In large part, it is due to the fact that no alternative is provided. Often, teachers are trained that, if verbal de-escalation doesn't work, the immediate next step is to use restraint or seclusion. No other options are offered nor is training provided on alternative techniques. What if, instead, teachers were provided with a set of highly effective, high leverage practices that promote students' social and emotional well-being while also keeping the classroom safer for everyone; practices that are based on the principle that all intervention should be used to comfort rather than control a student? Such practices not only exist but have been proven to be effective in public and private schools throughout the country. As a result, the number of incidents of problem behavior is reduced, there are fewer distractions in the classroom and teachers are able to focus on their core responsibility: providing quality instruction. With a trauma-informed approach and the proper training, restraint and seclusion can be eliminated without compromising the safety of educators or students. In addition, using such an approach will help to reverse other negative impacts of trauma such as higher dropout rates, attendance issues and impaired concentration. In this session, led by Kimberly Sanders, President of Ukeru Systems, session participants will be provided with concrete action steps and tools to prevent restraint, allowing them an opportunity to proactively look into the reasons behind students' challenging behaviors. It will help them to create the space to identify struggling students earlier, thereby giving them the support they need to be successful in school.

Presenters
avatar for Kim Sanders

Kim Sanders

Ukeru Systems is a division of Grafton Integrated Health Network.  Grafton is a behavioral health organization partnering with children, adolescents, and adults with complex needs for 60 years. Using its own experience as a model, Grafton developed Ukeru® (Japanese for “receive... Read More →


Friday November 30, 2018 10:45am - 11:35am
Laurelhurst - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:45am

Empowering Students With Complex Support Needs Using Multiliteracies
Limited Capacity seats available

This study explores how multimodal, student-designed narratives in the individualized education plan (IEP) meeting, implemented using a pedagogy of multiliteracies, can simultaneously engage and empower youth with complex support needs. The study suggests that the multiliteracies framework created an environment conducive to dialogic teaching, which led to student-engagement, student-initiation, and joy of learning. These changes were responsible for the new empowering learning spaces in problem-solving, complexity in use of tools and language, and self-knowledge. Further, it enabled the repositioning of the deficit identity of the students to one of competence.

Presenters

Friday November 30, 2018 10:45am - 11:35am
Salon I - Lower Level 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:45am

Full Academic Inclusion for Students with Intellectual Disabilities in a Large University
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will describe the process and outcomes associated with universally designed supports for students with intellectual disability and faculty engaged in a fully inclusive postsecondary education program. We will share preliminary results for the creative planning and utilization of universally designed adaptations to support students with intellectual disability in university academic coursework. Strategies and procedures for collaboratively planning, designing and implementing critical adaptations will be shared.

Presenters
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Professor, Portland State University


Friday November 30, 2018 10:45am - 11:35am
Douglas/Fir - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:45am

Implementation Science and Facilitating Inclusive Education: The TIES Center's Perspective
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will describe and provide the results from a literature review related to implementation science (IS). The presentation will include information on the theoretic foundations of IS, and its use in research on school reform, inclusive education, and inclusive education for students with severe disabilities. Presenters will describe how this information is being used by the TIES Center, the new National Technical Assistance Center on Inclusive Practices and Policies, to drive intensive technical assistance with states, districts, and schools to move students with significant cognitive disabilities to general education contexts in their home schools.


Friday November 30, 2018 10:45am - 11:35am
Mt. Hood - Second Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

10:45am