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2018 TASH Conference has ended
Each year, the TASH Conference brings together a diverse community of stakeholders who gain information, learn about resources, and connect with others across the country to strengthen the disability field. This year’s conference theme, “Be Creative - Innovative Solutions for an Inclusive Life,” reminds us to think outside the box during times of uncertainty. Creativity, innovation, and determination can pave the way for meaningful and inclusive lives for people with disabilities.

Friday, November 30 • 9:35am - 10:25am
Increasing Teacher Competence in Response Prompting Procedures by Using Behavioral Skills Training Seating Available

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Limited Capacity seats available

Textbooks in severe disabilities (e.g., Westling et al., 2015) typically include written descriptions and examples of response-prompting procedures. Extensive research demonstrates efficacy of response-prompting with students with disabilities for acquisition of a variety of skills (Cengher et al., 2018). Response-prompting procedures are recognized as an evidence-based practice (EBP) for students with severe disabilities (Browder et al., 2014). However, research on teaching teachers how to implement response-prompting procedures with accuracy and fidelity is far less common. Behavioral skills training (BST) is recognized as an evidence-based practice for staff training (Parsons et al., 2012) and has been applied in teaching graduate students to implement cognitive behavior therapy (Hassan et al., 2017), teaching graphing skills to graduate students (Kranak et al., 2018), and improving pre-service teachers' implementation of EBPs for students with autism (Sawyer et al., 2017). However, there is need to expand use of BST in teaching use of response-prompting. The BST protocol consists of (1) describing the target skill; (2) providing a succinct, written description of the skill; (3) demonstrating the skill; (4) requiring the trainee to practice the target skill; (5) provide feedback during practice; and (6) repeat steps 4 and 5 to mastery (Parsons et al., 2012). This presentation will discuss the evolution of strategies to teach graduate students to implement response-prompting procedures with accuracy and fidelity. The graduate course targeting these procedures is typically taught either online (combination of synchronous and asynchronous meetings) or as a hybrid; both course delivery methods can provide challenges in developing student competence in specific skills that might typically involve role play in a face-to-face classroom. The instructional evolution progressed from only written instructions in early semesters to students submitting videos for feedback in subsequent semesters to the inclusion of a few videos modeling the procedures. Ultimately, in the most recent semester, a more comprehensive BST procedure was used with far more success in developing student competence. The current BST process highlights each response prompting procedure in isolation (a one-at-a-time approach) and consists of (1) Posted readings explaining the process; (2) Instructor notes highlighting key aspects of the response-prompting procedure; (3) A video demonstration of the response-prompting procedure developed by either the instructor or graduate assistant (with an accompanying written instructional plan); (4) Student use of a procedural integrity checklist to review and critique the instructor-provided video with instructor video feedback provided on the critique; (5) Student submission of a video demonstrating use of the response-prompting procedure with an adult with submission of an accompanying instructional plan and a procedural integrity checklist and written self-critique; instructor feedback subsequently provided; (6) Student submission of a video demonstrating use of the response-prompting procedure with a K-12 student with an intellectual disability (with parent permission). The graduate student also submitted an accompanying instructional plan and a procedural integrity checklist and written self-critique; instructor feedback was subsequently provided. Graduate student performance data will be shared as will be end-of-the-semester social validity data. Social validity data indicated that the graduate students found all aspects of the BST process beneficial in learning to implement the response-prompting procedures with accuracy and fidelity. Data for six response prompting procedures will be shared: (1) least-to-most prompting; (2) most-to-least prompting; (3) progressive time delay; (4) constant time delay; (5) graduated guidance; and (6) simultaneous prompting.


Friday November 30, 2018 9:35am - 10:25am
Sunstone - Third Floor 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland, OR 97201

Attendees (10)